Tahoe Weekly https://thetahoeweekly.com Lake Tahoe's Complete Events, Entertainment, Recreation, Dining, Art guide Thu, 20 Sep 2018 23:18:59 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.8 California’s first underwater trail in Emerald Bay https://thetahoeweekly.com/2018/09/californias-first-underwater-trail-opens-in-emerald-bay/ Wed, 19 Sep 2018 23:18:04 +0000 https://thetahoeweekly.com/?p=47933 California State Parks and the Sierra State Parks Foundation have unveiled California’s First Maritime Heritage Underwater Trail located in Lake Tahoe’s Emerald Bay. Starting Oct. 1, the public will be able to experience California’s first maritime heritage underwater trail devoted to showcasing Lake Tahoe’s historic recreational watercraft and barges that now rest below the surface […]

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Divers install one of the new interpretive panels | Courtesy California State Park

California State Parks and the Sierra State Parks Foundation have unveiled California’s First Maritime Heritage Underwater Trail located in Lake Tahoe’s Emerald Bay.

Starting Oct. 1, the public will be able to experience California’s first maritime heritage underwater trail devoted to showcasing Lake Tahoe’s historic recreational watercraft and barges that now rest below the surface of Emerald Bay, according to a press release from California State Parks.

On Sept. 28, state park dive team members will broadcast an underwater tour with live video and audio at 2 p.m. on the Facebook page for California State Parks and the Sierra State Parks Foundation.

Scuba and snorkel diving visitors will be able to explore an underwater trail with historic features at several sites along the shoreline of Emerald Bay State Park. Currently, divers have access to the Historic Barge Dive Site established by California State Parks in 1998. The department has never publicly released the location and information of three additional sites highlighted in this underwater trail until now.

Download the:
Interpretive Panels
Dive Cards
Map of Emerald Bay dive sites

Underwater interpretive panels have been placed at four dive sites in Emerald Bay. Waterproof interpretive cards created for divers will be available at the park’s visitor centers, local dive shops and parks.ca.gov. These panels and interpretive cards were made possible by the Sierra State Parks Foundation.

These boats were scuttled when they outlived their usefulness, but now serve as reminders of the golden age of recreation in Tahoe. This collection is the largest, most diverse group of sunken small watercraft of its kind, in their original location, known to exist in the nation.

The Barge Dive Site, located off the southeastern shore of the bay, was initially established in 1998. The site consists of two barges, built of massive Ponderosa pine timbers, sitting at a depth between 10 to 40 feet deep. The barges were owned and operated by the lumber companies, who used them to haul cordwood part of the year and then employed them as car ferries during the summer months. Since the barges had no means of propulsion, they were either towed or pushed by steamers. The southernmost barge, lying parallel to shore, represents the more complete of the two and measures more than 100 feet long. This site is accessible to both snorkel and scuba diving park visitors.

The remaining dive sites – Passenger Launch “Florence M,” Wooden Fishing Boat and Hard Chine Skiff – on the trail are associated with the Emerald Bay Resort. The resort was one of the longest continuously operating resorts of this type in the area. The land was acquired by the State in the 1950s and the buildings were removed to make way for the campground.

The resort once existed on what is now Boat Camp, the lake’s only boat-in campground on the north shore of the bay. Compared with Tahoe’s luxury hotels, the Emerald Bay Resort was a simple family resort with a hotel, cottages, tent pads, dance pavilion and all necessary infrastructure including several piers where steamers could dock to unload passengers and supplies. The resort offered several forms of recreation, but the small recreational boats were a popular element to the experience.

Divers photographs one of the wooden barges. | Mylana Haydu, Indiana State University, Center for Underwater Science

Just offshore of Boat Camp is a collection of small vessels that were sunk at their moorings, 30 to 60 feet below the surface. The cold Tahoe water helps to preserve these boats, some of which are more than 100 years old. The collection includes a metal kayak, day sailor and launch along with wooden fishing boats, rowboats and motorboats. Along with the two large barges, the Emerald Bay Maritime Heritage Trail includes two fishing boats and a 27-foot long launch.

The launch likely represents the oldest boat in the collection. She was built in 1915 at the Stephens Brothers boatyard in Stockton. Proprietor of the Emerald Bay Resort purchased the boat, “Florence M,” and brought it to the lake in 1926 to provide day excursions for resort guests.

The Sierra State Parks Foundation has invested $27,832 toward the completion of the Emerald Bay Maritime Heritage Trail since 2016. The Foundation contracted for the production of underwater interpretive signs for use at the sunken boat and barge locations at Emerald Bay State Park, including the production of a dive card about these sites. The Foundation funded the design and fabrication of the underwater blocks and associated interpretive panels and underwrote the costs of the dive team to research this project and position the interpretive panels. | parks.ca.gov, sierrastateparks.org


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First hints of fall in Tahoe https://thetahoeweekly.com/2018/09/first-hints-of-fall-in-tahoe/ Wed, 19 Sep 2018 19:01:33 +0000 https://thetahoeweekly.com/?p=47890 The first hints of Tahoe’s magnificent, but short-lived, fall season have begun to appear. The pine needles are falling, the trees are starting to change colors here and there, pods of windsurfers have returned to surf the afternoon swells brought on by the growing winds (soon it will be surfing season as swells reach heights […]

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Doug Stoup of Ice Axe Expeditions enjoys a starry September evening as the edge of the Milky Way galaxy stretches out over the night sky above Lake Tahoe’s East Shore. Photography by Matt Bansak | MattBansak.com, @Matt.Bansak.Photography

The first hints of Tahoe’s magnificent, but short-lived, fall season have begun to appear. The pine needles are falling, the trees are starting to change colors here and there, pods of windsurfers have returned to surf the afternoon swells brought on by the growing winds (soon it will be surfing season as swells reach heights to compare to the Pacific), and the last vestiges of wildflowers begin to shed their seeds.

I was among a group of hikers on a Trails & Vistas art hike recently that become transfixed by a thicket of fireweed as it shed its seed pods to be carried off by the breeze. The air was so thick with seeds that it looked like it was snowing.

Tim Hauserman also enjoyed the first glimpses of fall color during a trek through Coon Canyon to the top of Basin Peak, with sweeping views of Castle Peak, Round Valley and the Sierra Buttes for his feature on “Wonders of Coon Canyon & Basin Peak.”

The start of fall also means bears are in a mad rush to prepare for their winter hibernation, so it’s a good time to pick up a copy of one of Krissi Russell’s books that teaches kids to not feed bears and other wildlife, among other lessons. A South Lake Tahoe teacher and author, Russell recently released her third book, which is a bilingual version of “No alimente a nuestros osos | Don’t Feed our Bears.”

Former LakeTahoeNews.net Publisher Kathryn Reed is now an occasional contributor for Tahoe Weekly magazine and wrote the story on Russell for her inaugural piece. I look forward to working with her on more stories about the Tahoe Sierra.


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Wonders of Coon Canyon & Basin Peak https://thetahoeweekly.com/2018/09/wonders-of-coon-canyon-basin-peak/ Wed, 19 Sep 2018 19:00:21 +0000 https://thetahoeweekly.com/?p=47837 The hike past Frog Lake Cliffs through Coon Canyon to the top of Basin Peak has just about everything you could want on a hike except a lake you can swim in. There are incredible mountain vistas, sparkling streams choked with wildflowers, fabulous craggy rock formations and an abundance of ancient trees. While not designated […]

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Dropping into Coon Canyon after passing Frog Lake Cliffs.

The hike past Frog Lake Cliffs through Coon Canyon to the top of Basin Peak has just about everything you could want on a hike except a lake you can swim in. There are incredible mountain vistas, sparkling streams choked with wildflowers, fabulous craggy rock formations and an abundance of ancient trees. While not designated as a wilderness, once you get into Coon Canyon it sure feels like one.

There is one caveat to this hiking paradise: at 12 miles and just over 3,000 feet of climbing, it is not a Sunday stroll — unless your idea of how to spend a Sunday starts early in the morning and continues unabated for the rest of the day.

The hike begins at the top of Donner Summit. From Truckee, take the Boreal Exit off Interstate 80, turn right and drive to the end of the pavement. Here begins a dusty walk up the dirt road toward Castle Pass. At about a half mile, where a particularly glorious view of Castle Peak appears, the route leaves the road to the right and follows the Donner Lake Rim Trail. This winds gently up and down through forest and over rocky terrain showing off great trail-building skills until it meets the Warren Lake Trail where you turn left.

Now is when the first of two major climbs begins. It’s a several mile-long ascent through thick forest and mule’s ears to the edge of a massive ridge, which continues from Frog Lake Cliffs all the way to Basin Peak.

Here, a quick detour is in order to the top of Frog Lake Cliffs, where from the rocky precipice you look down on Frog Lake, which given its shape I feel should be named Peanut Lake. Whatever you call it, it’s gorgeous. In addition to the lake, the 360-degree views also show you that Basin Peak is still a long way off.

View from the top of Basin Peak looking south toward Castle Peak, Round Valley and Sugar Bowl.

Don’t worry, it’s worth it. The hike drops down through a forest of hemlocks, crosses a few minor streams then descends farther into what for me is the highlight of this hike: Coon Canyon. High above sits the incredible craggy fortress of Castle Peak, which looks much more impressive from the north side than from the south and west sides, which can be seen from the freeway. Then the route follows a 3-mile jaunt across an enormous bowl with perhaps a dozen streams, magnificent trees and rock formations that rival anywhere else in the Sierra. It’s so pretty, you might almost fail to notice that you always seem to be going up steeply to climb out of a deep gully or dropping precipitously into the next one.

Another highlight of Coon Canyon is that it often contains all the seasons in one place. The deep gullies hold snow well into fall after a big winter. Even this year they still host bustling streams with lots of wildflowers. Meanwhile, on the open slopes, low-lying bushes show the bright red of fall as the dried mule’s ears flutter in the breeze.

Eventually, at the northern end of the bowl you reach a saddle and a trail junction. Take the left turn toward Devil’s Oven, but just follow it for a short distance before beginning your bushwhack up the ridge toward Basin Peak. It’s steep at first, but then becomes a gentle ascent through an open hemlock forest. Near the top it gets steep again — especially considering how long you have been hiking already. Take a pause to check out the late-blooming Sierra Primrose, then stay toward the left and shoot for the ridgeline. Once you reach the broad ridge, there is a trail to the top of the peak.

Joyce Chambers hikes through Coon Canyon with Castle Peak in the background.

As you might expect, the view from Basin Peak is exceptional. To the south is Castle Peak and Round Valley. The Sierra Buttes can be seen to the northwest; spin slowly around in a circle and you can see about 50 miles in every direction. It was a windy place though, so we didn’t stay long. A trail heads down the ridgeline to the west with views of an enormous forest of young hemlocks to the north. At first the trail is steep and then it contours to the south and eventually drops down to meet the Pacific Crest Trail. Turn left and follow the PCT as it switchbacks through the trees to Round Valley, where you can impress yourself with your accomplishment by checking out Basin Peak high above.

Now with tired legs, you pass the Sierra Club’s Peter Grubb Hut and do your last ascent out of Round Valley to Castle Pass, where after starting down a steep descent you have a decision to make: take the PCT, which is probably about 1 mile longer, but on a lovely, shady trail or follow the dusty road back to your car. We were beat, we took the road. But even in our exhausted mental and physical state, we could still smile at the beauty of Coon Canyon and the views from Basin Peak.


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Paddleboarding tips & tricks | Local pens SUP book https://thetahoeweekly.com/2018/09/paddleboarding-tips-tricks-local-pens-sup-book/ Wed, 19 Sep 2018 18:59:42 +0000 https://thetahoeweekly.com/?p=47839 Writer Kayla Anderson has melded her passion for standup paddleboarding and writing into her third e-book, which she released earlier this summer. “Stand Up Paddleboarding 2.0: Top 101 Stand Up Paddle Board Tips, Tricks, and Terms to Have Fun, Get Fit, Enjoy Nature, and Live Your Stand-Up Paddle Boarding Passion to the Fullest From A […]

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Writer Kayla Anderson has melded her passion for standup paddleboarding and writing into her third e-book, which she released earlier this summer.

“Stand Up Paddleboarding 2.0: Top 101 Stand Up Paddle Board Tips, Tricks, and Terms to Have Fun, Get Fit, Enjoy Nature, and Live Your Stand-Up Paddle Boarding Passion to the Fullest From A to Z!” was published on July 31 and is available at Amazon.com. This book is a follow-up to her second book, “Stand Up Paddle Board Racing for Beginners: A Quick Guide on Training for Your First Stand Up Paddleboarding Competition.”

After graduating with a degree in journalism from California State University, Chico in 2004 Anderson made her way to Florida where she worked for Wake Boarding Magazine. Just two years later she arrived in Tahoe with the lofty goal of becoming a snowboard bum. She started out as a lift operator, but ended up spending 10 years in marketing and public relations for Diamond Peak Ski Area and Mount Rose Ski Tahoe.

“My favorite part of the marketing job was the writing part. What I love about writing is I meet so many different and interesting people. I like doing the research and expanding my horizon, as well,” said Anderson.

She finally decided that since it was really the writing that she loved, she needed to become a freelance writer.

Summer Vandelinder heads out onto Big Blue with Kayla Anderson, putting her tip and tricks to good use

“I saved up money to get through the winter and started looking for writing assignments,” said Anderson.

She began working for Enjoy Magazine in Redding, then the Sparks-Tribune, and blogging for travelwriter.net. She is now is a regular contributor for Tahoe Weekly.

The opportunity came up through a freelance writing Web site to write an e-book.

“I’ve done all different forms of writing. I looked at books as a way to challenge myself with something different,” said Anderson.

She wrote a book about the benefits of working at a stand-up desk, then the opportunity to write her book about paddleboard racing came up. This turned out to be a challenge for three reasons. First, she had never raced a paddleboard before. Secondly, she got the assignment in the fall when there are no paddleboard races at Tahoe. Thirdly, the publisher wanted the book to be finished in four weeks.

The good news is she works at Waterman’s Landing in Carnelian Bay. Owners Anik and Jay Wild are both world-class paddleboarders, so she had a ready source for expert advice. She also had access to a paddleboard and a great place to paddle, just a short bike ride from her home.

Anderson found a race in Alameda and she spent four weeks training for it. She would paddle about four mornings a week, then ride back home and write. She relied not only on the expert advice of the Wilds, but on her own experiences training and racing in her first race. Contrary to the often-given advice to write about what you know, Anderson likes to learn about something by writing about it. It is through those fresh eyes that she feels she can provide a more powerful perspective. Writing about paddleboarding helped her to become a better paddler, by forcing her to focus on the details.

Kayla Anderson has turned her love of paddleboarding into two e-books. | Courtesy Kayla Anderson

Her latest book, which gives tips on paddleboarding from A to Z, gave Anderson a chance to combine time on the paddleboard with her love of research to discover all the ins and outs of paddleboarding. For example, it took some deep digging to come up with a paddleboard topic that starts with the letter X. “Stand Up Paddleboarding 2.0” is twice as long as her first book and she put that one together in just two months.

“The first book was more of a personal experience of training for my first race and the second is more of a glossary. It is somewhat a sequel,” said Anderson.

The online market for e-books, according to Anderson, “has given more opportunities for writers to break into the field. I’m glad I became a freelancer when I did. I can be anywhere in the world and write.” | amazon.com/Stand-Up-Paddleboarding-2-0


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Lost Sierra Hoedown | Welcome to the T Party https://thetahoeweekly.com/2018/09/lost-sierra-hoedown-welcome-to-the-t-party/ Wed, 19 Sep 2018 18:58:07 +0000 https://thetahoeweekly.com/?p=47870 If Thelma and Louise had long-lost second cousins who were just as wild but adored singing harmonies instead of robbing banks, that just might begin to paint the picture of three East Bay sisters singing in beyond-perfect harmony as they cruise the open road, eyes wide to the sunset horizon. These are the Tietjen Sisters […]

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If Thelma and Louise had long-lost second cousins who were just as wild but adored singing harmonies instead of robbing banks, that just might begin to paint the picture of three East Bay sisters singing in beyond-perfect harmony as they cruise the open road, eyes wide to the sunset horizon.

These are the Tietjen Sisters — or the T Sisters for short.

As a radiant landscape scrolls by in the distance, artistic, laidback, thoughtful Rachel sings the low part with a raw, jazzy, country-blues swagger. Her twin sister, Chloe, the sweet, compassionate and empathetic poet of the group, joins in effortlessly and truly on the high harmony. Stubborn, brassy, big sister Erika takes the melody on this one with an indie pop vibe that would be at home swapping songs and sipping whiskey by a campfire with Juliana Hatfield.

Watch the music video for “Come Back Down”

“I remember there was some point when we were really little, we wrote a song for one of our parents for Father’s Day or Mother’s Day,” Erika says. “Somewhere there is a cassette tape of us. It’s really silly, really basic, super squeaky little voices.”

These children of San Francisco dancers and musicians split their idyllic summers between the shelly shores Old Saybrook, Conn., and a Berkeley performing arts camp run by their mother’s friend, Russell Wright.

“It was just something we loved being a part of this wacky thing,” she says. “We weren’t thinking about it very cerebrally or profoundly. We just thought it was fun. We just wanted to do it. When you do something as kid, you don’t think about how it will affect your life later on. But looking at it now, it has had a big impact on the path we are following today.”

On long California road trips as kids, Erika undauntedly sang countermelodies along to the cassette tapes playing in the car stereo, much to the annoyance of Rachel and Chloe in the back seat.

“Some people have the ability to visualize things like creating sculptures or painting and some people hear things,” Erika says. “For me, there is something innate about hearing and reproducing sounds. From a really young age, I was able to hear harmonies.”

On reuniting after university studies and travels abroad, a few choreographed renditions from Hans Christian Anderson’s “The Little Mermaid” at The Starry Plough just north of the Berkeley/Oakland line created a buzz that led to featured performances in and around the Bay Area. This was followed seamlessly by a string of high-profile festival gigs at High Sierra, Strawberry and Kate Wolf music festivals and one memorable turn on NPR’s “A Prairie Home Companion.”

Since then, they’ve performed with countless acts young and old, always bringing full-throated smiles and that special, unforgettable something to every stage they share.

“The secret if you are getting started is to find the best harmony singers, try to emulate what they are doing and copy it so it becomes a part of your language,” she says. “Then you can apply it to your own thing and create your individual palate of music. There are so many things you can do when you start playing with it.”

After producing “Kindred Lines” in 2014 with Laurie Lewis, the T Sisters came out with an eponymous follow-up in 2016 and a “Live from Tiny Telephone” EP in 2017. This summer they recorded three songs with The Wood Brothers in Nashville, Tenn., before accompanying the crossover artists on a breezy tour throughout the Northeast.

The T Sisters will play six shows in California this month before journeying out to Minnesota with their unassumingly solid backup band. They will be hosting a T Party in the Tent at Lost Sierra Hoedown on Sept. 22 at 4:30 p.m.

As the women motor along on their unscripted sibling adventure, the gently rolling scenery is surely humbling, but what you are really left with at the end of the day is the lingering, magnetic, spellbinding harmony that weaves from their sororally entwined souls like the easy, flowing country road itself.

Lost Sierra Hoedown
Sept. 20-23
Johnsville Historic Ski Bowl | Plumas-Eureka State Park

“There is definitely some measure of fate that factors into it all,” says the free-spirited songstress at the wheel. “We love the weird, random, friends of friends connections we make along the way. Through it all, we lean on each other depending on the circumstances. And so far, for the most part, it’s worked out.” | lostsierrahoedown.com


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“Mystic Threads” Weave Together Soul and song https://thetahoeweekly.com/2018/09/mystic-threads-weave-together-soul-and/ Wed, 19 Sep 2018 18:57:22 +0000 https://thetahoeweekly.com/?p=47872 A random trip to Ananda Village in the Sierra Nevada foothills has led one local musician on a life-changing journey through energy and sound to a power greater than oneself. When Joaquin Fioresi, a blue-collar songwriter from south San Francisco, started to join in the chanting at the yoga and meditation retreat 10 miles north […]

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A random trip to Ananda Village in the Sierra Nevada foothills has led one local musician on a life-changing journey through energy and sound to a power greater than oneself.

When Joaquin Fioresi, a blue-collar songwriter from south San Francisco, started to join in the chanting at the yoga and meditation retreat 10 miles north of Nevada City, something just felt right.

“I received a cosmic whack and saw the power of how music creates this invisible chain,” he says.

Years later, on his first album of chanting, “Mystic Threads,” Fioresi puts his heart and soul into a crossroads of 1990’s Southern California pop and sacred music.

“It’s not even really Kirtan to me, to be honest,” says the musician and yogi. “I found the ancient prayers in Sanskrit are simply the best hooks ever written. The quintessence of the mantras is the cadence. It’s the way the rest sinks into rhythm.”

The 46-minute LP kicks off with the rolling cymbal of “Gam Gam Vibration,” bright guitars and keyboards coming in over a vast, durable rhythm track of drum and bass. It’s Jack Johnson meets Krishna Das with Fioresi’s flowing lyrics leading the way through the infinite, tremulous light.

“It’s totally me,” he says of the album. “I put my whole self into it.”

“Unreal to the Real” tapes prayer to record with ethereal, swirling sitar, the singer going between English and Sanskrit as he unlooses truthful words into layer on layer of rippling intergalactic darkness.

“Saraswati” begins with some pretty strumming worthy of a George Harrison solo record as Fioresi croons in endearing innocence. It’s exactly this freedom of expression that makes “Mystic Threads” more than a Kirtan record.

The album was produced in the Point Reyes home studio of Robin Livingston, who is best known for his work with modern, sacred-music touchstone and flag bearer, MC Yogi.

“Robin is a genius,” says Fioresi. “He inspired the heck out of me and became like a family member.”

“Power to the Peaceful” calls to mind John Lennon and Ben Harper with its percussive guiro-led shuffle and openminded lyrics.

Then “Asatoma” channels sublime vibes before building to a peak led by Johnny Mojo’s Fender guitar.

“He’s like my brother,” says Fioresi of Achilles Wheel’s free-wheeling front man he first met at an open mic at the Cozmic Café in Placerville. They played in Soulbridge from 2004 to 2009.

“Dissolving” does didgeridoo over the drone of a detuned synthesizers until retreating into the soothing sound of falling water.

The descending fiddle of Jenni Charles from Dead Winter Carpenters sets up “Shavasana” alongside a pure clear light voice that fades into the alone yet not alone repetition of “O namah shivaya, oh namah shivaya … .” It’s a song about surrender, letting go, repurposing your old self into something beautiful and new.

In fact, Fioresi has made his music available for free to all yoga teachers and healing artists to use during their practice. Half the proceeds from the record go to Suicide Prevention Lifeline.

“My inspiration and motivation is liberation,” he says. “We are meeting music and mind.”

“Lokah (Everybody In All The Worlds)” presents Sanskrit version of Phish’s “Dirt” before kicking into the chilled-out pop vibe Fioresi does so well.

“Everybody, everybody in all the worlds, may they become peaceful, happy and free,” chants Fioresi and his friends at the ashram.

“Gayatri” is stripped-down Red Hot Chili Peppers meets Iron & Wine where Fioresi tries out some freestyle rhyming and beatnik verse over an Eagles-esque Latin mood.

The album concludes with “Twameva,” a prayer giving thanks over a steady hum and vibration of two simple chords meditating between the sound of reflected, yet interconnected, worlds.

Fioresi’s partner, Emily Tessmer of Orenda Blu, adds a touch of vocals in union nearly as perfect as their son, Shiloh Dev, born last year.

“You are my mother, my father, my lover, my friend. You are riches. You are wisdom. You are my all, my all,” sings Fioresi to his family, to the universe, to God.

It’s an exquisite sentiment from a genuinely superb human, musician, father, brother, lover and friend who has created something special to share with the world. | joaquinfioresimusic.com


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Krissi Russell | Keeping wildlife Safe in Two Languages https://thetahoeweekly.com/2018/09/krissi-russell-keeping-wildlife-safe-in-two-languages/ Wed, 19 Sep 2018 18:56:59 +0000 https://thetahoeweekly.com/?p=47828 It doesn’t matter the language or the critter, the message is the same: Don’t feed wild animals. “The issue is all over the planet. It doesn’t happen just in Tahoe. It’s just different animals,” says Krissi Russell. “We need to learn to interact appropriately with wildlife so they can survive.” The South Shore resident is […]

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Author and teacher Krissi Russell.

It doesn’t matter the language or the critter, the message is the same: Don’t feed wild animals.

“The issue is all over the planet. It doesn’t happen just in Tahoe. It’s just different animals,” says Krissi Russell. “We need to learn to interact appropriately with wildlife so they can survive.”

The South Shore resident is doing her part to teach people that feeding bears – along with coyotes, geese and other critters – is the wrong thing to do.

Russell this summer came out with her third book, this one in Spanish. It’s an adaptation of her first book, “In the Meadow (Don’t Feed Our Bears),” that was published in 2008. She’s titled the new book, “No alimente a nuestros osos | Don’t Feed our Bears.”

Even though this will be her 25th year teaching Spanish at South Tahoe Middle School, translating the book wasn’t a slam dunk. Her books are a bit poetic and written in a cadence to be sung. To keep that rhythm in Spanish some of the words had to change, which means it is not a word-for-word translation.

Author and teacher Krissi Russell.

For instance, in English it reads: “Well, it goes like this. I was sitting outside on the front porch swing.” In Spanish, the book describes a front patio.

“The words don’t match up, but it’s the same message,” Russell says. “It was a big challenge to try to get the sentiment and reformatting the whole thing.”

Keeping the tempo of the writing was key because the new books come with a downloadable song, making this a sing-along story. Her previous books included CDs.

This written-song format allows Russell to blend her loves: education, environment, Spanish and music.

She says studies show there is a connection between singing and learning, which is one reason why she incorporates song into her lessons at school.

Her voice was echoing through the halls of Lake Tahoe Community College this summer during the weeklong Intensive Spanish Summer Institute where she was selling the book to all levels of Spanish speakers and readers. While the book is geared toward ages 2 to 8, the message applies to all.

Russell is hoping locals and visitors will read, hear and sing the story about bears and other animals that need to stay away from human food so ultimately they all stay wild and safe.

Author and teacher Krissi Russell.

Adding to the words, song and message are delightful watercolor illustrations that bring the bring it all together in way that is even more vivid than the imagination. The artwork is by Lois Olsen, Russell’s husband’s aunt who lives in Southern California.

It was Russell’s then 8-year-old son Caleb (he’s now 20) who was the inspiration for the words and the images. It was through his experiences with the wildlife in the Lake Tahoe Basin that led Russell to write a song she could play on guitar and the family could sing around the fire when they camped. From there it evolved into this picture book that has message for all ages, now in two languages.

“My life’s work is to educate people. This is an extension of that,” Russell says.

The book is available through Russell on her Web site for $13.95. On the South Shore it is sold at Explore Tahoe visitor and interpretive center, Driftwood Café and Lake Tahoe Historical Society Museum, as well at Strawberry Station. It is also available at The Tree House in Truckee. | littlebearbooks.net


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Restoring historic Pioneer Monument https://thetahoeweekly.com/2018/09/restoring-historic-pioneer-monument/ Wed, 19 Sep 2018 18:54:29 +0000 https://thetahoeweekly.com/?p=47788 The Sierra State Parks Foundation is seeking donations for The Donner Project, a capital campaign to restore the Pioneer Monument at Donner Memorial State Park, which turned 100 years old in June. Read Mark McLaughlin’s history of the monument Watch a video about The Donner Project The Pioneer Monument was dedicated on June 6, 1918, […]

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Courtesy Sierra State Parks Foundation

The Sierra State Parks Foundation is seeking donations for The Donner Project, a capital campaign to restore the Pioneer Monument at Donner Memorial State Park, which turned 100 years old in June.

Read Mark McLaughlin’s history of the monument
Watch a video about The Donner Project

The Pioneer Monument was dedicated on June 6, 1918, and was erected in honor of all who made the difficult trek across the western plains and mountains to reach California during the 1840s.

Constructed near the site of the cabins that gave shelter to the Donner Party, work on the monument began in 1901. Since then, the monument has stood in testament to the thousands of families and individuals who risked all for a better life, and honors the pioneer spirit of those who came before us. Read about the history of the monument at TheTahoeWeekly.com.

After nearly 100 Truckee winters it is in dire need of repair. This project includes restoration of the Pioneer Monument along with site improvement landscaping and construction of an outdoor community educational pavilion. Donations may be made online. | sierrastateparks.org


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Israeli artists featured for anniversary https://thetahoeweekly.com/2018/09/israeli-artists-featured-for-anniversary/ Wed, 19 Sep 2018 18:53:38 +0000 https://thetahoeweekly.com/?p=47830 This year the State of Israel celebrates 70 years since its founding by the United Nations following World War II. To mark this occasion, the Nevada Museum of Art presents exhibitions by Israeli artists Michal Rovner and Tal Shochat. These contemporary artists create work grounded in the history of photography, while delivering a fresh and […]

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“Cherry Tree Spring” from triptych Tal Shochat | Nevada Museum of Art

This year the State of Israel celebrates 70 years since its founding by the United Nations following World War II. To mark this occasion, the Nevada Museum of Art presents exhibitions by Israeli artists Michal Rovner and Tal Shochat. These contemporary artists create work grounded in the history of photography, while delivering a fresh and independent viewpoint to the dialogue surrounding art and environment. “Celebrating Israel’s 70th anniversary, Michal Rovner and Tal Shochat” will be on view through Oct. 14 in Donald W. Reynolds Center for the Visual Arts, E. L. Wiegand Gallery. | nevadaart.org


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Join Comstock Water History tour https://thetahoeweekly.com/2018/09/join-comstock-water-history-tour-2/ Wed, 19 Sep 2018 18:51:56 +0000 https://thetahoeweekly.com/?p=47893 Join a park ranger on a guided tour through the back country of Lake Tahoe Nevada State Park on Sept. 22 at 9 a.m. from Carson City following the remnants of the historic Virginia Gold Hill Water Company flumes and pipes, and discuss Comstock history. Be prepared for a day of driving through the back country […]

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Courtesy Nevada State Parks

Join a park ranger on a guided tour through the back country of Lake Tahoe Nevada State Park on Sept. 22 at 9 a.m. from Carson City following the remnants of the historic Virginia Gold Hill Water Company flumes and pipes, and discuss Comstock history. Be prepared for a day of driving through the back country and some short hikes along the way. Vehicles are provided. Bring lunch, water, sturdy boots and sunscreen, and dress for the weather.

Read Mark McLaughlin’s account of the Virginia Gold Hill Water Company

Reservations are required and participation is limited to the first 12 people. Free. | Register (775) 749-5980 or spooner.ranger@gmail.com


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