Tahoe Weekly https://thetahoeweekly.com Lake Tahoe's Complete Events, Entertainment, Recreation, Dining, Art guide Fri, 23 Aug 2019 17:33:41 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.2.2 https://thetahoeweekly.com/files/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/cropped-SiteIcon_Tahoe-2-32x32.png Tahoe Weekly https://thetahoeweekly.com 32 32 Tahoe’s wildflower explosion https://thetahoeweekly.com/2019/08/tahoes-wildflower-explosion/ Wed, 21 Aug 2019 19:00:57 +0000 https://thetahoeweekly.com/?p=54184 It’s late August and in the higher elevations amid still-lingering patches of snow that may never fully melt this year, wildflowers are emerging in brilliant shows of color. Tim Hauserman explores the wildflower haven of the Mokelumne Wilderness, where trails for every ability await from the Carson Pass, which he wrote about in this edition. […]

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Lauren Bobowski and Lilah Salm enjoy the wildflowers on the Tahoe Crest. Photography by Ryan Salm |RyanSalmPhotography.photoshelter.com, @RyanSalmPhotography

It’s late August and in the higher elevations amid still-lingering patches of snow that may never fully melt this year, wildflowers are emerging in brilliant shows of color.

Tim Hauserman explores the wildflower haven of the Mokelumne Wilderness, where trails for every ability await from the Carson Pass, which he wrote about in this edition.

I was on Donner Summit last week on the Glacier Meadow Loop Trail with my nephew and the wildflowers were just beginning to open for the season. The displays at lower elevations are also still on full display. I also visited the Ward Creek Park on the West Shore last week to check out the flowers in the meadow and was not disappointed by a brilliant explosion of Arrowleaf Balsamroot.

With winter conditions lingering late this year, expect the wildflowers to enjoy a long run this summer. For some other great wildflower areas to explore, visit TheTahoeWeekly.com and click on Summer: Wildflowers under the Out & About menu.

Kids Ultimate Tahoe Summer Bucket List

Take the challenge and check off items on our Kids Ultimate Tahoe Summer Bucket List for everyone. Share your photos #TheTahoeWeekly. Visit TheTahoeWeekly.com; click on Out & About for the list.

In this edition: #19




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Sweet Iration for a Tahoe Nation https://thetahoeweekly.com/2019/08/sweet-iration-for-a-tahoe-nation/ Wed, 21 Aug 2019 18:59:43 +0000 https://thetahoeweekly.com/?p=54168 According the Urban Dictionary, “ iration” is the word Rastas use for “creation.” The letter “i” refers to God, you, me and everyone else. It’s around this aspiration for soulful interpersonal connection in which Santa Barbara reggae rockers Iration are creating a much-loved legacy in the California sun. Aug. 23 | 6 p.m. MontBleu Resort […]

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According the Urban Dictionary, “ iration” is the word Rastas use for “creation.” The letter “i” refers to God, you, me and everyone else. It’s around this aspiration for soulful interpersonal connection in which Santa Barbara reggae rockers Iration are creating a much-loved legacy in the California sun.

Aug. 23 | 6 p.m.
MontBleu Resort Casino | Stateline, Nev.

These friends formed in college towns around Santa Barbara and companions have toured together since 2008, spreading an aloha spirit and positive vibes to music lovers around the globe. Their newest single, “Chill Out,” offers a commonsense suggestion for coping with the stresses of modern life over blissed-out SoCal sunshine reggae.

“A big part of it is having those positive feelings inside of you when you go up on stage,” says lead singer and guitarist Micah Pueschel. “We’re all friends. We’ve all know each other for a long time. It’s an attitude and lifestyle that we try to live. We’re trying to keep everything to stay a little better.”

Like several other members of the band, Pueschel was born and raised in Hawaii where music is a part of daily life.

“It’s so much of a scene,” he says. “You grow up singing. You grow up playing music. It’s like a part of culture is jamming, everybody playing ukulele and some people playing guitars.”

Although Pueschel admits Iration has occasionally been on the wrong end of the “Aren’t you just a bunch of white guys who play reggae?” affront, this sort of self-imposed division isn’t something that informs their everyday experience as artists.

“If you respect the culture and the people you won’t have an issue,” he says. “We’re not out there talking about Rastafari and making some faux-political message. In general, our music is on the side of: we want everybody to feel accepted for whatever racial, sexual or religious preference they may have. We want to feel that it incorporates everybody. We’re 100 percent inclusive. We don’t want to leave anyone outside of the circle.”

Connecting with Fans

To help bring this loving vision into action, the band has begun a tradition of hosting a meet and greet with supporters before each show.

“We know the way the music industry is now; it doesn’t make sense to keep this mystical persona that doesn’t talk to your fans and if you see me it’s a special occasion,” says Pueschel. “We started it because there was a desire to have a sort of VIP experience for some of the fans that are very involved and want a little extra. They want to be able to tell us, say something or see it up close.”

“That’s the model a lot of bands are doing now,” says Pueschel. “It creates a stronger bond with your fanbase. It’s knowing we care about the people that make our career go and appreciating them. And they show us how much the music means to them.”

Since Iration tours in almost every state in the nation, they are able to communicate on an intimate level with folks from all walks of life.

“We’ve met everyone from Native American people on reservations, to military men and women that are serving abroad, to veterans and retirees,” says Pueschel “We’re in red states. We’re in blue states. We’re all over the place. For us, it’s very rewarding to talk to these people.”

After an afternoon sound check, they take the time to converse with admirers, listening to personal stories of how music has changed their lives for the better.

“We’ve spoken with cancer survivors and people that are struggling,” says Pueschel. “They all come and tell us, ‘This is what your music has helped me through.’”

Although many of Iration’s signature tunes were casually penned on college couches in Isla Vista, the band’s affirmative attitude and commitment to the road has woven these songs into the very fabric of people’s lives.

“It’s surreal,” says Pueschel. “We wrote these songs back in the day and they helped someone get through something maybe way more serious than what it was originally about. If we weren’t touring and doing these meet and greets, we wouldn’t be able to see these people and touch their lives. The most rewarding part of touring is meeting everyone and getting that feedback. As far as a message, it’s universal: we’re on the side of standing up for everybody.” | montbleuresort.com




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Mokelumne Wilderness | Wildflower Haven https://thetahoeweekly.com/2019/08/mokelumne-wilderness-wildflower-haven/ Wed, 21 Aug 2019 18:58:23 +0000 https://thetahoeweekly.com/?p=54146 About 25 miles south of South Lake Tahoe on State Route 88 sits Carson Pass. Here just a few miles west of Kirkwood Mountain Resort the snow piles up so massively each winter that often the road is closed due to avalanche danger or Cal-Trans’ inability to keep up with the snow levels. In the […]

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Round Top Lake and Round Top Peak. | Tim Hauserman

About 25 miles south of South Lake Tahoe on State Route 88 sits Carson Pass. Here just a few miles west of Kirkwood Mountain Resort the snow piles up so massively each winter that often the road is closed due to avalanche danger or Cal-Trans’ inability to keep up with the snow levels. In the summer, Carson Pass is the entrance point into the Mokelumne Wilderness. Here among high volcanic peaks and sparkling mountain lakes all that snow produces an amazingly prolific wildflower display. And it rewards the procrastinator, since the flowers are just getting good in August.

Frog Lake | 2 miles roundtrip | Easy-Moderate
Winnemucca Lake | 5 miles roundtrip | Moderate
Round Top Lake | 6.8 miles roundtrip | Moderate
Round Top Peak | 9 miles roundtrip | Strenuous
Fourth of July Lake | 10 miles roundtrip | Strenuous

From State Route 88 you can hike a moderately-easy, 5-mile out and back to Winnemucca Lake, or continue on to Round Top Lake to escape the crowds and find new views; it’s a 6.8-mile round trip. From Round Top Lake two more challenging options present themselves: hike the very steep pathway that heads to the top of 10,381-foot Round Top Peak or take the wildflower-laden steep descent down to Fourth of July Lake, which is 1.5 miles farther.

The hike begins at the Carson Pass Information Station at the top of the pass. When coming from Tahoe be ready for a quick left turn just as you reach the crest. Parking is limited and costs $5. The information station is in an old wood cabin and is certainly worth your time.

John Carnell takes in the view high above Mokolumne Wilderness. | Mary Carnell

In 1 mile of gentle climbing you reach Frog Lake. It’s a shallow body of water that at first glance might not look worth a stop, but take a stroll along the lake’s eastern edge and you will arrive at the top of the rocky ridgeline with astounding views into Hope Valley. Back on the trail, just a bit farther brings you to a junction where the Pacific Crest Trail goes left and your route to Winnemucca Lake heads right; you will pass to the west of the prominent slope of Elephant’s Back, which looks like its name. Too bad it lost its head.

Now the walking is through widely scattered forest with 360-degree views and lush fields of alpine wildflowers. Look for lupine, paintbrush, giant green gentian and dozens of other varieties of flowers — and pat yourself on the back for being lucky enough to see this cool a wildflower display in August.

Winnemucca Lake is a large mountain lake just at the northern base of Round Top. Be sure to have a windbreaker with you, because this lake is often wind swept.

Mary Carnell in a sea of wildflowers looking toward Round Top. | John Carnell

If you turn around here, you will have had a good day, but if you have the energy, press on. It gets better and the crowds lessen. Past Winnemucca, you climb moderately for about 1 mile to Round Top Lake. Here, you can lounge along Round Top Lake’s peaceful shore enjoying the power and majesty of Round Top Peak towering above you. Also, you have two other options: climb up to the viewpoint above Round Lake or descend down to Fourth of July Lake.

Going Up

From Round Top Lake a day-use trail can take you to a saddle just below the rocky summit of the peak. It is very steep, and the footing is a bit loose, but the view is extraordinary up in the high-alpine realm. Don’t be surprised to see patches of snow; Round Top is a favorite place for back-country skiing in the summer. When the trail peters out near the top, experienced climbers can scramble up to the rocky crest, but I never have; the view from trails’ end is sublime enough.

Going Down

From Round Top Lake, take the descent, a 1,300-foot drop to the bottom of a deep bowl. Did you catch those words: deep bowl? Don’t forget what those words mean when you turn around and start heading back up. The good news is as you climb slowly back up, you will have wildflowers to enjoy. My suggestion is head up toward Round Top to see those views rather than climb down to Fourth of July Lake.

Whichever part of this wilderness excursion you choose, you are in for a spectacular landscape of volcanic mountaintops, fields of wildflowers and clear mountain lakes. Get out there and enjoy it. No need for a mad dash, the flowers will stay awhile. | alltrails.com




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Becoming a Junior Ranger https://thetahoeweekly.com/2019/08/becoming-a-junior-ranger/ Wed, 21 Aug 2019 18:57:10 +0000 https://thetahoeweekly.com/?p=54144 The Tahoe Sierra has an abundance of land designated for public use that provides endless opportunities for those of us who love to be immersed in nature. This land is preserved and cared for by agencies such as the California and Nevada state park systems and the U.S. Forest Service. These agencies work to foster […]

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Anikin Allen works on the activity book for the California State Parks Junior Ranger program. | Katherine E. Hill

The Tahoe Sierra has an abundance of land designated for public use that provides endless opportunities for those of us who love to be immersed in nature. This land is preserved and cared for by agencies such as the California and Nevada state park systems and the U.S. Forest Service. These agencies work to foster continued conservation and hope to pass this practice on to future generations.

Check off  KIDS BUCKET LIST #19 on our Ultimate Tahoe Summer Bucket List

To achieve this, these agencies focus on educational outreach with programs such as the Junior Ranger program. Kids are naturally curious and want to learn about the world around them. The Junior Ranger program taps into their curiosity and teaches them the importance of protecting our natural resources through fun games and activities.

Junior Ranger programs vary among public agencies, but most are suited to ages 5 to 13. Most offer self-guided programs and participants receive a guidebook or logbook with activities to complete on their own while they explore the park. The activities generally include playing games, hiking trails, observing wildlife, identifying plants and listening to talks.

Anikin Allen worked on earning his California State Park Junior Ranger badge after a recent visit to the Balancing Rock at D.L. Bliss State Park. | Katherine E. Hill

Guidebooks are usually available at the visitor center, park office, ranger station or camp host and sometimes online. Once the required activities are complete, the book can be turned in at the same location or submitted by e-mail or mail, and kids receive a badge.

My 6-year-old son Anikin has done several Junior Ranger programs and enjoys the activities. When we visit a park or other public area, we check to see if they offer a program. It usually takes Anikin about 10 to 15 minutes to complete each activity page with a little help from an adult. Sometimes he is required to take a pledge before receiving the reward, which is often a Junior Ranger badge or patch. He’s so excited about earning badges during our trips, that he insisted on getting a ranger vest to put all of his badges on.

Recently we took a trip to D.L. Bliss State Park on the West Shore of Lake Tahoe and got a California State Parks Junior Ranger Adventure Guide from the entrance station. This is a more generic guidebook that can be used and submitted at participating state parks in California. The guide is available in English and Spanish. Some of California’s state parks also offer programs specific to the area but are only available by visiting that park office or station.

The first few pages in the guide ask questions about general information and special features about the park. My husband Luke recorded the name of the park and that we took a hike on the Balancing Rock trail. We also recorded that the park is named after Duane Leroy Bliss and is a testing ground for American bald eagles.

Anikin Allen shows off his Junior Ranger vest sporting National Park Service and U.S. Forest Service badges. | Katherine E. Hill

Anikin completed the Signs and Symbols page where he matched the sign or symbol to the correct name or description. He identified signs for hiking trails, campgrounds, picnic areas and other important universal park symbols. Some he knew and others we helped him figure out. He also completed the Park Safety Search and Junior Ranger Word Match, which were fairly easy for him.

Some of the other pages prove a little more difficult such as ones with questions about nature and ecology. There’s one that asked him to write a poem, another to look for signs of wildlife such as tracks or feathers.

With a little assistance, he finished the guidebook. Luke read the Junior Ranger pledge to him and Anikin signed the page promising to care for and protect the earth and all living things, to be careful in his actions and to learn about the importance of nature and heritage. We still need to turn in the completed book to get the reward and Anikin is hoping it is a badge like the ones he has earned before.

Other California state parks in our areas that offer Junior Ranger activities are Emerald Bay, Sugar Pine Point and Donner Memorial state parks. Donner Memorial State Park in Truckee has a guidebook specific to the park and offers a guided experience with a park ranger. Lake Tahoe-Nevada State Park also has a program at Sand Harbor.

Check online or call the office, station or visitor center at the area you plan to visit to inquire if Junior Ranger programs are available before you go. | kids.parks.ca.gov




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Vikingsholm Celebrates 90 Years https://thetahoeweekly.com/2019/08/vikingsholm-celebrates-90-years/ Wed, 21 Aug 2019 18:57:07 +0000 https://thetahoeweekly.com/?p=54174 Lora Josephine Knight’s legacy is enshrined in the magnificent Vikingsholm that she built 90 years ago in Emerald Bay. In 1928, the she purchased the 240-acre property from the William Henry Armstrong family for $250,000. The acquisition included the bay’s Fannette Island. Knight had become acquaintances with the Armstrong’s through church affiliations and Lora adored […]

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Vikingsholm at Emerald Bay. | Mark McLaughlin

Lora Josephine Knight’s legacy is enshrined in the magnificent Vikingsholm that she built 90 years ago in Emerald Bay. In 1928, the she purchased the 240-acre property from the William Henry Armstrong family for $250,000. The acquisition included the bay’s Fannette Island. Knight had become acquaintances with the Armstrong’s through church affiliations and Lora adored the picturesque bay that reminded her of a Norwegian fjord. In 1929, she had her majestic Scandinavian-designed home constructed.

Read about Lora Knight’s Wychwood Estate

Lora Knight was very familiar with Lake Tahoe having previously owned a charming lakefront estate called Wychwood at Chinquapin, a sheltered cove just east of Dollar Point near Carnelian Bay. Eight years before her marriage to Harry Knight, Mrs. Josephine Moore purchased the land at Chinquapin from descendants of timber baron Duane L. Bliss. During her summer vacations, Mrs. Moore enjoyed squiring guests across Big Blue in her classic wooden runabout named “Chipmunk.”

Vikingsholm tours
Daily 10:30 a.m.-4 p.m. until Sept. 30
Tours every 30 minutes

Lora Small was born in Galena, Ill., in 1864. Her father, Edward Small, was a corporate lawyer who took on two brothers as partners in his law practice — William Henry Moore and James Hobart Moore. As fate would have it, Lora married James and her sister Ada married William. After Edward Small’s death, William and James took over the firm and formed the Moore Brothers partnership. The sibling entrepreneurs eventually amassed a fortune with controlling interest in a number of large American corporations such as the Diamond Match Company, U.S. Steel and National Biscuit (Nabisco), the maker of Oreo cookies.

In 1884, Lora gave birth to their only child, a son Nathaniel, who later married Helen Fargo, heiress to the legendary Wells Fargo banking dynasty founded in San Francisco during the Gold Rush. Nathan was an avid golfer and a participating member of the American Olympic team that won the gold medal at the 1904 Summer Games in St. Louis, Mo. Nathan was rich and reckless; he died at the age of 25 of “natural causes” after spending the previous night at the Everleigh Club, Chicago’s most famous and expensive brothel. His nationally reported death led to a crackdown on Windy City bordellos and morphine abuse.

Other than their son’s tragic death, life was good for the Moores. But after their purchase of the Chinquapin property, James’ health began to fail. In early 1916, they bought a home near Santa Barbara hoping that the mild Mediterranean climate might improve his condition, but he died on July 20, 1916, leaving an estate worth $15 million to Lora.

In 1922, Lora Moore married Harry F. Knight, a stockbroker from St. Louis. Unfortunately, they were not happy together and divorced after two years. Lora and Harry had met Charles Lindbergh when they hired the young airmail pilot to fly them over a possible home site. Lindbergh ran into Harry Knight again at a St. Louis airfield where he was taking flying lessons. Lindbergh approached the couple about helping fund his historic attempt to be the first to fly nonstop across the Atlantic Ocean. A divorce was looming, but they agreed to be major supporters. In later years, Lindbergh frequently visited Lora at Vikingsholm.

Lora Knight had a life-long reputation for generous hospitality, philanthropy and financial contributions to youth groups in California and Nevada. Knight loved Lake Tahoe and for 16 years she enjoyed her summers at Wychwood, hosting friends and family members. In 1928 she sold her lakefront estate to Robert Stanley Dollar, a wealthy San Francisco businessman, and immediately bought Emerald Bay. She commissioned Swedish architect Lennart Palme — to whom she was related by marriage — to design Vikingsholm. She chose the Scandinavian motif because she admired Palme’s Scandinavian-designed home in New York; the Emerald Bay scenery was reminiscent of steep fjords she had explored in Norway. Palme and Knight traveled to Scandinavia that summer to research the design features that would be incorporated into Vikingsholm. They visited Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden as they inspected buildings dating back centuries.

The structure was built quickly during 1929 as 200 workmen and artisans, housed in temporary barracks, quarried nearby stone and cut lumber. Support timbers were hand hewn and interior wallboard meticulously hand-planed, while metal fixtures like fireplace screens, hinges and latches were hand-forged on site. In order to preserve the natural environment of Emerald Bay, Knight insisted that local materials be used with the exception of the leaded windows with stained-glass panes imported from Sweden. Lennart Palme said: “The problem of placing Vikingsholm without disturbing the trees was perhaps the trickiest I have had to solve either abroad or in these United States.”

Finnish carpenters were brought in because of their skill hewing timber, while a Scandinavian craftsman was hired to create intricate exterior wood carvings. Carvings from ancient church entrances were incorporated into many Vikingsholm door entries. Pieces of wood resembling spikes adorn the gutters in a nod to the Scandinavian custom used to ward off evil spirits. The roof of the north and south wings is topped with sod where grass and flowers grow each spring. Carved dragon heads are common decorations; they were used in old Viking castles to divide the main room between the chieftain and his honored male guests from women and children.

Knight filled her castle with antiques she picked up in Scandinavia. If native heirlooms could not be removed from the country, Knight had craftsmen reproduce them in exact detail, including the aging of the wood and even mimicking scratches on the originals. Despite its ancient motif, Vikingsholm had all the conveniences available in the 1930s, including electricity, modern fixtures and private baths in the bedrooms. There was also a boathouse for Knight’s largest boat, a beautiful mahogany cabin cruiser named the “Valkyrie.” The estimated cost for the total project was $500,000.

During construction of the main house, Knight had a granite teahouse that resembled a small castle built on the crest of Fannette Island in the middle of Emerald Bay. Locally quarried boulders were ferried by barge to the island where derricks lifted them stone by stone. Despite the expense and effort, the structure was rarely used. Knight spent the rest of her summers at Vikingsholm until her death in 1945.

A narrow road connects Vikingsholm with State Route 89, but it’s limited to pedestrians. Mrs. Knight had it graded in 1929 for $10,000 so that she and her guests could arrive by automobile. Today, Knight’s Viking home is considered the finest example of Scandinavian architecture in North America.

Vikingsholm is now administered by the California Park System and is open to the public for tours until September 30; the grounds are open year-round. Limited parking is available on Highway 89 in Emerald Bay. The best days to visit are weekdays during the summer.

On Aug. 24, Sierra State Parks Foundation is hosting a birthday party fundraiser for the iconic monument. It is unfortunately already sold out. | sierrastateparks.org, parks.ca.gov




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Bike to the beach | New trails ease access to popular beaches https://thetahoeweekly.com/2019/08/bike-to-the-beach-new-trails-ease-access-to-popular-beaches/ Wed, 21 Aug 2019 18:56:17 +0000 https://thetahoeweekly.com/?p=54148 In June, Tahoe East Shore Trail opened extending from Incline Village, Nev., to Sand Harbor State Park. Earlier this spring, the West Shore Bike Trail opened extending beyond Sugar Pine Point State Park to Meeks Bay Resort. The two trails combined add only 4 miles of paved multi-use trails to Tahoe’s extensive network of trails. […]

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The Tahoe East Shore Trail. | Tim Hauserman

In June, Tahoe East Shore Trail opened extending from Incline Village, Nev., to Sand Harbor State Park. Earlier this spring, the West Shore Bike Trail opened extending beyond Sugar Pine Point State Park to Meeks Bay Resort. The two trails combined add only 4 miles of paved multi-use trails to Tahoe’s extensive network of trails. However, they are key connectors and game-changers for locals and visitors because now two of Tahoe’s favorite beaches are accessible via bike or foot.

Where the trail ends at Meeks Bay. | Tim Hauserman

Tahoe East Shore Trail

Tahoe East Shore Trail is 3 miles long, but it was a monumental undertaking to plan, finance and construct. Most of it was built on a rocky, steep slope in the narrow area between the highway and one of Tahoe’s most spectacular shorelines.

One way the planners dealt with the challenging terrain was to include six bridges, including one that is 810 feet long — the longest bridge in the Tahoe Basin. There is also a tunnel under State Route 28 eliminating the need to cross this busy road, 23 separate view pullouts, a restroom facility and numerous lake access points with bike racks. There is even a bike maintenance station at the key tunnel intersection.

The result is a trail that provides incomparable views of the lakeshore. While Sand Harbor is certainly one of the prettiest locations on the planet, the journey to get there is just as nice as the destination. And for many, the purpose of the trail will not be to reach Sand Harbor, but just to explore a few miles of stunning scenery away from the highway.

Users of the trail can begin their ride from one of a series of parking lots lined up along State Route 28 in front of Tunnel Creek Café. Long-time locals will remember this as the location of the Ponderosa Ranch of “Bonanza” TV fame.

Tunnel Creek Cafe is also at the end of the famous Flume Trail mountain-biking route that starts at Spooner Summit. Amy Berry, CEO of Tahoe Fund, which helped raise more than $1 million toward the construction of the trail, envisions many Flume Trail riders wanting to end their ride by taking a dip in the lake via Tahoe East Shore Trail.

“I think the most remarkable thing I have witnessed on the path so far is the huge diversity of people who are walking and riding it: from the very young to the aged and across many ethnicities. It is so inviting to everyone and giving so many new people wonderful access to the East Shore for the first time,” she said.

The new West Shore Bike Trail. | Tim Hauserman

West Shore Bike Trail

The 1-mile extension from Sugar Pine State Park to Meeks Bay allows folks to safely access the lovely sand at Meeks Bay and the busy Meeks Creek trailhead into the Desolation Wilderness. Before completion of this segment, Tahoe Trailways Bike Path, which begins in 64-Acres Park in Tahoe City, ended at the edge of the road at the southern border of Sugar Pine Point State Park. This left riders and walkers enticingly close to Meeks Bay, but on the busy, narrow and curvy State Route 89.

West Shore Bike Path parallels the highway on the lakeside for about a half mile, giving users a few glimpses of Lake Tahoe and then it switchbacks several times, easing the grade, before rolling right to the entrance of Meeks Bay Resort’s Wa-She-Shu Grille. The 10-mile-long Tahoe Trailways Bike Path from Tahoe City now has a truly world-class ending to all that pedaling or walking.

Tips for trail blazing

Bring plenty of water and food, sunscreen, a bike lock, a towel and a swimsuit — and you are set for the day. Park the car and hike it or walk it— and take one more car off the busy highways.




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Revive Tahoe | Inspired by nature https://thetahoeweekly.com/2019/08/revive-tahoe-inspired-by-nature/ Wed, 21 Aug 2019 18:55:07 +0000 https://thetahoeweekly.com/?p=54134 Like many Tahoe locals, two decades ago Revive Tahoe owner Allie Broadhurst came to South Lake Tahoe for the snow, stayed for the summer and never left, discovering she was an artist at heart. In 2004, she unleashed her creative spirit when her grandfather-in-law gave her a box of copper flashing. She acquired a ball-peen […]

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Pieces inspired from that a road trip though the Bonneville Salt Flats in Utah. The patina was a mixture of a small amount of salt from the flats then polished off to resemble the mountains and sealed in. | Courtesy Allie Broadhurst

Like many Tahoe locals, two decades ago Revive Tahoe owner Allie Broadhurst came to South Lake Tahoe for the snow, stayed for the summer and never left, discovering she was an artist at heart.

In 2004, she unleashed her creative spirit when her grandfather-in-law gave her a box of copper flashing. She acquired a ball-peen hammer and made three copper bracelets. She shared with me a photo of her first copper cuff laying on a piece from the Bonneville Salt Flats in Utah.

“The first image is my very first cuff ever made and still my favorite. The patina was a mixture of a small amount of salt from the flats then polished off to resemble the mountains and sealed in,” she says.

A few years later when she started tinkering around with reclaimed copper, her family gave her an air compressor for Mother’s Day. She used that along with a siphon hose to sandblast the Keep Tahoe Blue logo onto a wineglass. As she kept honing her craft, her friends and family kept asking for bracelets, earrings and engraved glassware until she realized that she had created a business.

Earrings inspired by nature. | Courtesy Allie Broadhurst

That same year, she showcased her goods at the Zawadisha Holiday Bazaar, which raises money for a fund that provides loans to Kenyan women. She participated in the annual Made in Tahoe Festival in Olympic Valley and started selling her jewelry and/or etched pieces at GaiaLicious Boutique, On Tahoe Time and the Landing Resort & Spa in South Lake Tahoe, Trunk Show in Tahoe City, and Blue Wolf Studios in Kings Beach and Reno, Nev.

“I’m a rambling artist and a collector of tools. I’ve never had any formal training. I’m just figuring things out through the process and some things stuck, so I made it into a business,” Broadhurst says.

“I’m a pretty earth-friendly person and I don’t like to use chemicals in my daily life,” she says of her environmentally safe practices.

To make her jewelry, Broadhurst takes on unusable copper from electricians, roofing companies and other contractors and then she cuts, hammers and refinishes it into unique wearable art.

The first cuff Allie Broadhurst made on a road trip though the Bonneville Salt Flats in Utah. | Courtesy Allie Broadhurst

“It comes to me pretty gnarly from the aging and then I work with that by cleaning and sealing it off,” she says.

In her process, Broadhurst will make a recipe of salt and vinegar to create a patina finish and then soak the material, spray it or suspend it to get a desired look. Her copper comes to her in all colors which she works with — sometimes she uses tobacco to give it a blackened, antique feel.

To create her etched glassware, Broadhurst uses two processes: one in which she sandblasts an image onto the product and another in which she uses a diamond bit tool to hand-cut images. Her biggest challenge she says is to stay inspired: “I’m constantly learning, adjusting and rotating my collection.”

She loves to travel and gets inspiration from nature. On a recent weekend trip, she and her family went to Mount Shasta to watch her son compete in a mountain-bike race; she got some ideas for her next project of etched olive-oil bottles to be sold at Pineapple in Tahoe City. She also gets inspiration from the material itself whether it’s reclaimed copper or something she finds in her backyard.

The tools of the trade. | Courtesy Allie Broadhurst

“The definition of ‘revive’ is to bring new life or energy to. For me that means bring new life to the copper and let the copper jewelry bring new energy to you,” she says. “The ‘Tahoe’ in Revive Tahoe is where I live and work, but also the place where a lot of my inspiration comes from. Walking, being out in nature, living in Tahoe — we have everything here — the golden-hour sunsets with the light coming through the trees ….”

Her favorite part about being a business owner is who she gets to meet, from visitors who are wearing her jewelry to repeat clients who keep coming back for more.

“I just want to keep spreading the love of my jewelry, creating new jewelry and staying inspired,” she says. | revivetahoe.com




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Composting program aims to reduce waste https://thetahoeweekly.com/2019/08/composting-program-aims-to-reduce-waste/ Wed, 21 Aug 2019 18:54:47 +0000 https://thetahoeweekly.com/?p=54150 A group of us are seated on a bench in a beautiful garden amid rows and rows of green lettuce, kale and basil plants at Truckee Demonstration Garden in Truckee River Regional Park. A variety of bees buzz in and out of purple flowering plants. Blondie’s “Heart of Glass” reverberates in the distance from the […]

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Polly Triplat turning the compost while Slow Food Lake Tahoe president Andrea Schaffer looks on. | Priya Hutner

A group of us are seated on a bench in a beautiful garden amid rows and rows of green lettuce, kale and basil plants at Truckee Demonstration Garden in Truckee River Regional Park. A variety of bees buzz in and out of purple flowering plants. Blondie’s “Heart of Glass” reverberates in the distance from the band playing at Music in the Park. Nearby, wooden bins hold the secret to reducing waste.

Drop Off locations
Truckee Demonstration Garden | Until the end of October
Truckee Sunday Farmers Market | Until Sept. 29, 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
Truckee Town Hall | Year-round

Waste is a huge problem around the world. Leftovers and food that’s gone bad fill up home garbage cans and landfills. Rotting food waste produces methane, a greenhouse gas, and composting is one way to reduce garbage. To learn about composting, I recently attended a workshop hosted by Slow Food Lake Tahoe with local composting expert Polly Triplat.

Triplat, a former board member of Slow Food Lake Tahoe, shared her passion for giving back, reducing waste and creating compost that feeds and nourishes her gardens and houseplants.

Composting tips

  • Accepted items are vegetables, fruit, eggshells, plant materials, coffee & tea grounds
  • Use any container with a lid to collect items
  • Keep the container in the kitchen for easy use
  • Drop off scraps once or twice a week
  • Freeze compost if you can’t drop off weekly

“I was the garden manager here for a couple of years when Project MANA was the organization that managed the garden. I want to be part of the garden and Slow Food and give back. I have some wisdom about composting that I’ve acquired over the years,” she says.

For many composting is a way to reduce waste, for others it is a way to enhance gardens.

As we listened to Triplat, a woman and two children walked by with a bag full of food scraps. Triplat seized the opportunity to educate the group. We gathered around the bins and peered in.

Triplat picked up a metal tool and started prodding at the materials in the bin. There were a number of bins each serving a purpose. The first bin had a sign with an arrow, which directed people where to drop the food scraps, another bin held dry straw material and the last bin held the materials that break down into compost. Eventually, worms will begin to breakdown the materials and create compost.

The compost bins at Truckee Demonstration Garden. | Priya Hutner

Composting program

To help locals composting in the Tahoe Sierra, a new composting program was recently launched by the Town of Truckee, Keep Truckee Green and Slow Food Lake Tahoe.

“The program offers three ways to compost. The first is to come to the garden with your compost and put it in the bin over there,” says Slow Food Lake Tahoe president Andrea Schaffer, pointing to the large wooden bins filled with scraps of food and straw at the Truckee Demonstration Garden. The garden will accept compost until the end of October when it closes, weather permitting.

“The second thing you can do is use the drop-off location at the Truckee Community Farmers Market on Sundays [12047 Donner Pass Road] until Sept. 29. We also have a booth where you can get free composting bins while they last. Keep Truckee Green also has bins. The third way is to drop off materials in the bin with a green lid that looks like a recycling bin behind town hall near the airport. They will be accepting compost year-round.”

What to compost

For collecting scraps at home, Triplat suggests using a plastic bin with a lid. The Truckee program is accepting vegetables, fruit, eggshells, plant materials, coffee and tea grounds. Do not put in bread, bones, meat, dairy, seafood, fats, pet feces or kitty litter, plastic, compostable cutlery, compostable bags or containers, tissues or paper towels, cardboard or anything sprayed with pesticides or herbicides.

The scraps should be dropped off once or twice a week at one of the locations, and scraps can be frozen if it’s not possible to drop off that frequently. | slowfoodlaketahoe.org




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The Young Artists of Lake Tahoe Music Festival https://thetahoeweekly.com/2019/08/the-young-artists-of-lake-tahoe-music-festival/ Wed, 21 Aug 2019 18:52:33 +0000 https://thetahoeweekly.com/?p=54170 Have you ever wondered what it’s like to be a young artist in today’s world? How do you make your way? Where do you look for inspiration and companionship? Aug. 22 | 6 p.m. West Shore Café | Homewood  Aug. 23 | 6 p.m. Tahoe Maritime Center & Museum | Tahoe City  Aug. 24 | […]

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Kelly Kasle

Have you ever wondered what it’s like to be a young artist in today’s world? How do you make your way? Where do you look for inspiration and companionship?

Aug. 22 | 6 p.m.
West Shore Café | Homewood

 Aug. 23 | 6 p.m.
Tahoe Maritime Center & Museum | Tahoe City

 Aug. 24 | 6 p.m.
Squaw Valley Chapel | Olympic Valley

 Aug. 25 | 6 p.m.
Skylandia State Park | Tahoe City

For 26 twentysomethings this summer, the answer is Lake Tahoe Music Festival. Since 1983, this nonprofit has produced annual public summer performances in breathtaking venues throughout the region.

Meet four of the talented musicians who will be joining the academy orchestra this year.

Kelly Kasle
27, Plano, Texas

When it came time for Kelly Kasle to choose a musical instrument in the sixth grade, she went with the bassoon. The double-reed woodwind of lower register fit her tall, slender frame and mechanically minded personality.

One year, her high-school orchestra traveled to China for a concert tour.

“I loved that my instrument could take me all over the world, so I decided to see what happens.” says Kasle.

Kasle is now a teacher for the Los Angeles Philharmonic Youth Orchestra and a producer for Grammy-winning Israeli singer Hila Plitmann.

“I love what the academy creates,” she says. “Some of my most magical musical moments ever have been at festivals like this. We get to have intimate experiences in this beautiful lake setting and direct contact with the audience before, during and after the performance.”

Back in L.A., Kasle specializes in putting together close-knit events in the most unlikely of settings.

“That old way of going to an orchestra concert in a hall isn’t connecting with a wide array of audiences anymore,” she says. “It’s experiences like Lake Tahoe Music Festival that take us out of the traditional model. For me, that’s a huge checkbox for fulfilling what I love to do.”

Riley Conley

Riley Conley
23, Edinburgh, Penn.

“The bug kind of hit me once I started lessons in high school,” says trumpet player Riley Conley.

By the time he was performing more complex music by composers such as Gustav Mahler and Hector Berlioz, he was hooked.

“It’s just amazing to sit in the back and be enveloped by the whole sound,” he says. “Once you start playing with better musicians, it becomes a game of encouragement. When everyone around you is doing great stuff, it pushes you to play at a higher level.”

Someday Conley dreams of finding a job playing with the world-renowned orchestras of Cleveland or Philadelphia.

“You’re building friendships along the way and trying to make the best music you can, which is really all you can ask for,” he says.

Jay Julio

Jay Julio Laureta
21, New York, N.Y.

Jay Julio Laureta taught himself to play violin at age 11 from YouTube videos before changing to viola and attending Mannes School of Music on the Upper West Side of Manhattan. He still remembers the moment he first listened to Ludwig van Beethoven’s Symphony No. 5 at the suggestion of an inspiring teacher.

“It was the most amazing piccolo solo that made me fall in love with music,” he says.

Now Laureta is studying at Julliard School and preparing to audition with New York City Ballet, while jamming with 10-piece Italian art pop group Tredici Bacci around the city.

Laureta is glad to be a part of Lake Tahoe Music Festival: “To be in such a high-level orchestra, it’s really an opportunity to step into the professional world by meeting other early career professionals. There’s a camaraderie to it.”

Caitlin Stokes

Caitlin Stokes
27, Las Vegas, Nev.

Caitlin Stokes didn’t always love the violin.

“I hated it for a while,” she says. “I cried when I had to practice.”

It was a high-school teacher named Mary Straub who pushed her to make music her career.

“She was like a second mother to me,” says Stokes. “Within six months of studying with her, I was winning competitions.“

While many aspects of the classical music world can seem coldly competitive, she finds a family-minded community at Lake Tahoe Music Festival.

“We focus on making the most beautiful music we can,” she says. “It’s supportive and relaxed. We make personal connections.”

After completing her doctorate at University of Colorado Boulder, Stokes hopes to one day give back to the arts community that’s motivated her life journey.

“I want to be able to use my voice as an artist to support people that don’t have that opportunity,” she says. “I want musicians to be able to advocate for themselves.” | tahoemusic.org




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The Golf Club at Gray’s Crossing https://thetahoeweekly.com/2019/08/the-golf-club-at-grays-crossing-3/ Wed, 21 Aug 2019 18:51:18 +0000 https://thetahoeweekly.com/?p=54152 I first visited The Golf Club at Gray’s Crossing not long after it opened in 2007. I was impressed with the staff, course conditions and the layout. But I did not play well. A few years later, I paid a return visit and had the same result. I’ve always said that it’s easy to fall […]

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Tee Hole 6. | John Dee

I first visited The Golf Club at Gray’s Crossing not long after it opened in 2007. I was impressed with the staff, course conditions and the layout. But I did not play well. A few years later, I paid a return visit and had the same result. I’ve always said that it’s easy to fall into the misconception that a course at which you play well is a good course and one at which you play poorly is not. I was looking forward to re-evaluating my opinion.

Par 72 | 18 Holes
Yardage | 5,132 to 7,466
Slope | 111 to 140
Rating | 64.0 to 74.3

The Peter Jacobson/Jim Hardy design opened as a private facility and has a top-notch range and amenities. The recession of 2008 required a change in business plan to an upscale resort course. Now it is part of Tahoe Mountain Club along with its neighbor Old Greenwood. Lining each fairway, but out of play, are beautiful new homes designed in a modern and almost Frank Lloyd Wright style.

The first thing that you see from the tees are towering pines framing every hole. The course itself is rolling; the greens are sculpted into the surrounding terrain with no additional hills or hollows. They are large and fast. They also don’t break much. I strongly suggest a session on the practice green to get a feel for them.

The fairways are not as narrow as they appear but venture off and you find some sticky rough. Past the rough are natural areas. Fairways and greens are both well trapped, so hopefully your sand play is in good shape.

The signature Hole 6 is a downhill par 4 of 206 to 304 yards. The green has traps short left, long and right with traps also placed to catch a careless layup. A hill on the right side will deflect most shots back toward the green. There is an opening on the front right of the green so it is possible to bounce it on. The green slopes right to left, so if the pin is front right, your ball will roll to the back left leaving you a long and difficult putt. Pin placement may determine whether you go for it or not.

I might have been a little nervous making a return to Gray’s after two difficult rounds. Well, the third time was a charm. It does have its own look, but is still similar to other mountain courses. You can’t spray your shots and do well, but there is room for error. Greens that large and flat are different than you usually see, but taking time on the practice green — which I didn’t do the first two times — will do wonders.

Overall, a very enjoyable round and I am looking forward to my next visit. | grayscrossing.com




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