Tahoe Weekly https://thetahoeweekly.com Lake Tahoe's Complete Events, Entertainment, Recreation, Dining, Art guide Thu, 09 Apr 2020 18:49:23 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.4 https://thetahoeweekly.com/files/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/cropped-SiteIcon_Tahoe-2-32x32.png Tahoe Weekly https://thetahoeweekly.com 32 32 Snowshoe to Skunk Harbor on Tahoe’s East Shore https://thetahoeweekly.com/2020/04/snowshoe-to-skunk-harbor-on-tahoes-east-shore/ Wed, 08 Apr 2020 23:55:43 +0000 https://thetahoeweekly.com/?p=57308 While I normally try to avoid going downhill at the start, some snowshoe destinations are worth it. Such is the case with Skunk Harbor. This is often an overlooked excursion with snow on the ground. While plenty of people go there, seldom are there many people at the same time. This is perfect as you […]

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The beauty of Skunk Harbor is worth the trek down to Lake Tahoe. | Kathryn Reed

While I normally try to avoid going downhill at the start, some snowshoe destinations are worth it. Such is the case with Skunk Harbor.

This is often an overlooked excursion with snow on the ground. While plenty of people go there, seldom are there many people at the same time. This is perfect as you try to stay isolated even in the outdoors during this pandemic.

It’s a gradual 1½-mile descent from Highway 28 to the beach. The uphill ascent doesn’t feel so gradual, though. The elevation change is 560 feet. Sometimes there is no clear starting point because of all the snow. Some years it’s a pretty steep first 15 feet before it flattens out. Fortunately, a snowmobiler had laid a track for us, as had other snowshoers and cross-country skiers.

While I stay on dirt trails for erosion reasons, the virgin white snow can be so inviting that breaking trail can be fun. Sometimes it was fluffy; other times it was crunchy. No matter where one looked, it was a winter wonderland. It didn’t take long for Lake Tahoe to come into view. The openness of the trail in many ways made me feel like I was much farther removed from civilization than I was.

Tracks led to a knoll that we scampered up to get what was a stunning view of much of the lake. Depending on the snowfall and temperatures, ice may be clinging to the shoreline rocks and a stretch of sand could be exposed.

What is always visible are the remnants of Skunk Harbor’s past. While the U.S. Forest Service owns this swath of land on the East Shore, that wasn’t always the case. Stone buildings near the waterfront once belonged to George and Caroline Newhall. They used it as a second home for their San Francisco friends in the 1920s.

George Whittell Jr. then became the landowner. He once owned most of the East Shore down to Zephyr Cove. Pilings for what once was a pier protrude from the water. Despite these manmade intrusions, it is an otherwise undisturbed plot of forest. The trail is popular year-round and is dog friendly.  

Getting there
Parking is located along Highway 28 on the East Shore, 2.4 miles before the junction of Highway 50. There is no sign. Nevada Department of Transportation clears the area; do not block the access gate to the start of the trail.

 

 

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TJ’s Corral adds Clay Walker, LoCash to summer series https://thetahoeweekly.com/2020/04/tjs-corral-adds-clay-walker-locash-to-summer-series/ Wed, 08 Apr 2020 22:09:56 +0000 https://thetahoeweekly.com/?p=57303 TJ’s Corral at the Carson Valley Inn has added two dates to its summer concert series with LoCash on July 10 and Clay Walker on July 24. Tickets for both concerts go on sale on April 10. “Something to look forward to. That’s what many of us want during these unprecedented and trying pandemic times,” […]

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LoCash

TJ’s Corral at the Carson Valley Inn has added two dates to its summer concert series with LoCash on July 10 and Clay Walker on July 24. Tickets for both concerts go on sale on April 10.

“Something to look forward to. That’s what many of us want during these unprecedented and trying pandemic times,” writes Bill Henderson of Carson Valley Inn in a press release. “We’ve been sitting on a few concert announcements waiting for the time to be right but that’s how people miss out on life – waiting for the time to be right. So, we’re making a bold move today and unveiling two more TJ’s Corral concerts for July with the optimistic view and positive belief that this too shall pass and we’ll all be able to party again soon.” | carsonvalleyinn.com

TJ’s Corral 2020 Summer Concert Series
(updated April 8, 2020)

June 6 | Tanya Tucker
June 26 | Charlie Daniels Band
July 10 | LoCash
July 24 | Clay Walker
Aug. 19 | Trace Adkins


 

 

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Tahoe duo releases song, video to benefit COVID-19 relief efforts https://thetahoeweekly.com/2020/04/tahoe-due-releases-song-video-to-benefit-covid-19-relief-efforts/ Tue, 07 Apr 2020 18:36:59 +0000 https://thetahoeweekly.com/?p=57291 A creative duo based in North Lake Tahoe has released a new song and music video with a humorous take on the global crisis. The song, “Goin’ Viral,” tells the story of a struggling songwriter, Covid-19, and his band, the Symptoms, who embark on a world tour in support of their hit song of the […]

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Illustration Tamara Warren | Courtesy Eric Brandt

A creative duo based in North Lake Tahoe has released a new song and music video with a humorous take on the global crisis.

The song, “Goin’ Viral,” tells the story of a struggling songwriter, Covid-19, and his band, the Symptoms, who embark on a world tour in support of their hit song of the same name.

“Goin’ Viral” song is available on most music distribution platforms. Proceeds from song downloads will be donated to Covid-19-related relief organizations and efforts.

Song downloads and more info can be found at http://goinviralsong.com. The music video is available at https://youtu.be/yRbWeS3OSg0https://youtu.be/yRbWeS3OSg0.

“We’re hoping it will generate a little tongue-in-cheek comic relief and a brief respite from the stress and anxiety we’re all trying to cope with” says Eric T. Brandt, who co-wrote and produced the song with animator, Tamara Warren, said in a press release.

The idea and project began in mid-March, when the coronavirus pandemic was officially in the U.S. and on everyone’s mind. While throwing around song ideas after listening to the news updates on the spread of the virus, the song began to take shape.

“What better time to work on the songwriting and an animated video than while we’re stuck at home?,” says Brandt in the release.

A producer/songwriter who has worked with, performed and produced self-described so-called novelty music (The Surf Punks and Eric T. & the Skis) and produced music for film and television, Brandt describes the song as a parody-comedy-satire-metaphorical song performed by a fictional musician/rock star Covid-19 and his band, the Symptoms.

The song tells the story of Covid’s song “going viral” and his overnight rise to fame via social media.

“The parallels of the spread of the coronavirus, with the path of a popular song ‘going viral’ were too clear and too funny,” says Brandt in the release. “We couldn’t resist.”

The accompanying video, animated by co-writer and artist Warren, adds to the comic appeal of the song as Covid, a cute little virus cell-shaped character, travels and performs on his world tour as his song heads to the top of the charts. Ultimately, Covid comes to terms with the reality that he’ll be “done and gone” since his fame as a one-hit wonder makes him destined to fade away.

As a bonus, Covid leaves his audience with a new dance they can learn while stuck, quarantined in their homes.

“It’s kind of like an educational line dance,” says Brandt in the release. “It’s a fun reference to now well-known practices like social distancing, covering your face and hand washing.”

While the song does poke fun at a serious and deadly global pandemic, Brandt and Warren’s intent is to bring a little humor in these dark times.

“We’re all in this together, and people can use some comic relief,” says Brandt in the release. “Our hope is to generate some smiles and a few laughs, and we’re excited to be donating all proceeds from downloads of the song to Covid-19 relief efforts.” | https://erictbrandt.com/new-release-goin-viral

Social Media | #goinviralsong

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Amazing Tahoe books to read from Tahoe Weekly contributors https://thetahoeweekly.com/2020/04/amazing-tahoe-books-to-read-from-tahoe-weekly-contributors/ Fri, 03 Apr 2020 22:23:44 +0000 https://thetahoeweekly.com/?p=57269 Tahoe Weekly has great, local contributors that not only pen articles for Tahoe Weekly’s print and online editions, but many of them are also published fiction and nonfiction authors. Several of them are also quite prolific. If you’re looking for some good reading during this time of social distancing, I recommend ordering a copy from […]

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Views of Lake Tahoe from the Tahoe Rim Trail. | Tim Hauserman

Tahoe Weekly has great, local contributors that not only pen articles for Tahoe Weekly’s print and online editions, but many of them are also published fiction and nonfiction authors. Several of them are also quite prolific.

If you’re looking for some good reading during this time of social distancing, I recommend ordering a copy from one of our Tahoe Weekly contributors to support them and their great work – Kayla Anderson, Geolyn Carvin, Tim Hauserman, Barbara Keck, Mark McLaughlin, Lisa Michelle, Kathryn Reed and Mike White.

Kayla Anderson

Kayla is a long-time local writer, author and marketing maven, who has worked with Tahoe Weekly contributing features on local makers, Tahoe’s foodie culture, local profiles and recreation.

I don’t believe Kayla’s never met a challenge she can’t master and kick some ass while doing it. Check out some of her most memorable challenges she’s done for Tahoe Weekly from “16 Chutes in One Day” on Mt. Rose’s Chutes and “From Tahoe’s Slopes to Big Blue. 5 sports in One Day” after the epic 2017 winter season to her ongoing series for the last few years on “Tahoe’s Best Burgers.”

She recently released the “Northern California Road Trips” guidebook from Moon Books, and will be doing a virtual talk with Incline Village Library on April 21; details TBA.

“I believe the best way to relieve your wanderlust right now is to start planning your next trip,” says Kayla. “A good start is with my new Moon travel book, ‘Northern California Road Trips.’ Co-authored with Stuart Thornton, we share our favorite places to sleep, dine, hike, camp, and see in Northern California.”

The book is available at Barnes and Noble, Amazon, IndieBound or directly through Moon Books at moon.com. | kaylaanderson.org

Geolyn Carvin

I was first introduced to Geolyn’s work (and immediately became a fan) when I received a preview copy of her book “On the Trail with Boots McFarland-Volume 1,” a collection of humorous and thoughtful outdoor comics interspersed with entries from the artist’s Pacific Crest Trail journal.

After reading through her cartoons and sharing them my coworkers, I invited Geolyn to share her illustrations in each edition of Tahoe Weekly. I’ve enjoyed receiving her cartoons with her humorous look at life in the Sierra Nevada and it always arrives in my inbox just when a need a good laugh. She’s been contributing to Tahoe Weekly since the fall of 2018.

“These cartoons are colorful illustrations with a quirky sense of humor reminiscent of Gary Larson,” Geolyn says.

Purchase a copy of her book on Amazon. You can also sign up for her weekly newsletter at bootsmcfarland.com.

Tim Hauserman

I think Tim is the true master of the Tahoe lifestyle with his light-hearted demeanour, zest for enjoying Tahoe’s great outdoors at every possible moment and ability to hike, snowshoe, paddle or cycle in what I can only image is thousands of miles every year (at least).

I can’t really remember when I met Tim because I’ve known him for so long, but I’m sure we were talking about a great local hike when we decided that we needed to work together. Tim’s work has filled hundreds of pages of Tahoe Weekly through the years with hiking, mountain biking, cycling, paddleboard, canoeing, snowshoeing and cross-country skiing articles.

Tim is currently working on the 4th Edition of “Tahoe Rim Trail: The official guide for hikers, mountain bikers and equestrians,” which is scheduled for release this summer.

He’s also the author of “Monsters in the Woods: Backpacking with Children,” the children’s book “Gertrude’s Tahoe Adventures in Time” and “Cross-Country Skiing in the Sierra Nevada,” which are available on Amazon.

Barbara Keck

I remember vidily when I met Barbara at a local blind wine tasting event many moons ago, where we struck up a conversation and became friends over our shared sense of humor and sarcasm at the fact that the event organizers wrapped the bottle of wines in aluminum foil to mask their identity. Many of the bottles looked like the foil had been pulled out of the recycling bin been used to haphardzardly wrap the bottles by 7-year-olds.

After a good laugh and a few glasses of good wine, Barbara proclaimed “Hey, you need a wine colum.” I agreed immediately, we sealed the deal over a clink of our wine glasses, and Barbara penned our wine column from 2009 until Lou Phillips took over the column in 2014.

Barbara focused her columns on the hundreds of wineries spread across the Sierra Foothills, which resulted in her 2015 guidebook “Wineries of the Sierra Foothills: Risk-Takers & Rule-Breakers,” which was produced by Range of Light Media Group aka Tahoe Weekly.

Keck opens the adventure of the Sierra Foothills to wine lovers, focusing on 10 California counties with more than 280 small, welcoming family-owned wineries that make great wine. The book includes a wine-touring-friendly directory to the 280 wineries and notes their flagship wines and hidden gems.  The 21 “why they did it” winemaker stories finish with original recipes from those families that pair with their wines.

Copies are available at Tahoe House in Tahoe City or by emailing barbarakeck.winenewswriter@gmail.com.

The 2nd edition is in the works now as an Amazon ebook, will include the many new wineries opened in the last three years and an expanded section on the wineries of Butte County. | wineriesofthesierrafoothills.com

Mark McLaughlin

A prolific author, historian and weather guru, Mark has been a fixture at Tahoe Weekly for more than 22 years penning his column on regional weather, history and interesting characters.

He has the tenancity and grit of a hardened newspaper writer, with an unwaivering committement to the facts, while weaving interesting stories and characters through his work for Tahoe Weekly and in his many books, all traits I’ve long admired in his work.

You can purchase any of Mark’s books at thestormking.com, and he’s offering a limited time special: Get a free copy of “Sierra Stories: True Tales of Tahoe, Vol. 1” with the purchase of “SNOWBOUND!” You can also sign up for his “Tahoe Nuggets” blog.

“Sierra Stories: True Tales of Tahoe, Vol. 1” | A dozen exciting, true stories taking you back to the days of stagecoach hold-ups, skiing mailmen, train robberies and the lust of gold fever.

“Sierra Stories: True Tales of Tahoe, Vol. 2” | Fascinating tales about intrepid pioneer women, California’s first feminist, Mark Twain at Lake Tahoe, the Hermit at Emerald Bay and other classics.

“Western Train Adventures: Romance, Robberies & Wrecks” | Action-packed, illustrated adventure stories including the West’s first train heist; grizzled engineers blasting through snow-covered iron rails and lawmen tracking down desperadoes.

“The Donner Party: Weathering the Storm” | Fresh, dramatic and insightful, this book is a unique, weather-based look at this classic Western tale of the struggle for survival. Winner of three awards including Best Non-Fiction Book.

“Longboards to Olympics: A Century of Tahoe Winter Sports” | These inspiring and entertaining stories pay tribute to the character and accomplishments of the early pioneers who fired up Western winter sports, including the 1960 Winter Olympics at Squaw Valley.

“Skiing at Lake Tahoe” | Organized ski racing in America started near Lake Tahoe in the 1860s. Truckee opened the first winter carnival west of the Rockies in 1895 and Tahoe City bid for the 1932 Winter Olympics. Archival and modern photographs illustrate the history of skiing in the Tahoe Sierra.

“SNOWBOUND! Legendary Winters of the Tahoe Sierra” | The Tahoe Sierra endured some of the most severe winter weather in the world. Snowfall measured in feet, avalanches and wind gusts to 200 mph. “SNOWBOUND!” focuses on the Top 10 biggest winters since 1878. Winner of Best Non-Fiction Book Award.

Lisa Michelle

Lisa is a true Renaissance women if I’ve met one – writer, paddleboarder, screenwriter, filmmaker, former rodeo cowgirl and farrier, and all-around avid outdoorswoman. She’s penned articles about local makers and outdoor adventures near and far, including her Tahoe Weekly feature “Solo on Big Blue, A Five-Day Paddle on Lake Tahoe.”

She recently released “Mountain Misery: Calaveras Love Stories,” available on Amazon.

“Told with wisdom accrued like scar tissue, ‘Mountain Misery’ reminds us that love is a motley collection of emotion. Often twisted and tangled,” Lisa says of her book. “Set deep in the back-woods of Calaveras County on the verge of the Sierra Nevada, these stories offer an intimate and authentic look at those who exist in the darkness of failure but courageously continue to seek the light of possibility.”

Her next venture is the contemporary Western thriller, “Calaveras,” which will be released on May 1.

“Deep in the backwoods of Calaveras County accidents happen. For gritty rancher Kate Dunnigan, these deaths are nothing more than good old cowboy justice—until the day that justice hits home. Kate’s bucolic façade is destroyed when her pregnant daughter, Emma Lee, is wanted for murder. On the run from the police, Em is haunted by dirty secrets and Kate will stop at nothing to save her daughter from life in prison, even if it means using herself as bait,” says Michelle of her forthcoming book.  | lisamichelle2020.com, facebook.com/lisamichellestories

Kathryn Reed

An award-winning, pull-no-punches journalist, Kathryn and I have long shared a passion for hard-hitting local news coverage, which is how we met. We connected over our commitment to local news coverage and I started writing news stories for her former online news site, laketahoenews.net.

Since closing the site, Kathyrn has become a contributor to Tahoe Weekly and has penned three guidebooks on Tahoe, which she describes as “the ultimate outdoor playground.”

She released “The Dirt Around Lake Tahoe: Must-Do Scenic Hikes” in 2019, with a revised version published earlier this year. She followed that up with “Snowshoeing Around Lake Tahoe: Must-Do Scenic Treks.” Because there are plenty of people who like to do both sports, in March she combined the two into one book: “Lake Tahoe Trails For All Seasons: Must-Do Hiking and Snowshoe Treks.”

All three are available through Amazon and Barnes & Noble, with Tahoe area stores carrying some of her works. Local bookstores are able to order all three. You can also follow her blog at kathrynreed.com.

Mike White

I’ve long admired Mike’s work, a prolific guidebook author covering many trails and adventures in California and Nevada.

I own many of Mike’s guidebooks, but when I received my copy of his book “50 of the best strolls, walks and hikes around Reno” and discovered in the author’s bio that he lived in Reno, my heart starting racing. I’m serious, I got excited, my heart starting pounding and I immediately emailed Tim Hauserman and told him he needed to do a profile on Mike.

I then emailed Mike and asked him if he’d be interested in writing features on local hikes and snowshoe treks for Tahoe Weekly, and he accepted.

He recently released “50 of the Best Strolls, Walks, and Hikes Around Carson City” from the University of Nevada Press. His books are available from Univeristy of Nevada Press at unpress.nevada.edu/books, Wilderness Press at wildernesspress.com and Amazon.

“I have several books coming out this year. Sometime this spring, University of Nevad Press is publishing a companion book to the Reno one, “50 of the Best Strolls, Walks, and Hikes around Carson City,” which like the other one appeals to a broad range of people, as there are short, flat, and paved walks in city parks all the way to full-blown, back-country hikes,” Mike says.
“Coming out later in the year are long-awaited new editions to Wilderness Press books, “Backpacking California, Sierra South, and Sierra North,” which are all backpacking-related guides. Once the travel ban is lifted, I will be engaged in field work for updated versions of 50 Classic Hikes in Nevada” and “Top Trails Northern California’s Redwood Coast,” and for a new book, “Best Backpacking Trips in Washington, Oregon and Idaho.” In addition to these guides, I will be writing a book about some of my outdoor experiences (no working title at this point).”

“Afoot and Afield: Tahoe-Reno” | Features 201 outing in the Tahoe Region for every type of hiker, and many are suited for mountain bikers.

“Backpacking Nevada” | Discover untrammeled wilderness in the most mountainous state in the continental US. Explore the forests of the Carson Range, traverse the granite peaks and cascading creeks of the Santa Rosa-Paradise Peak Wilderness, or watch elk and antelope in the remote Jarbridge Mountains.

“Best Backpacking Trips in California and Nevada” | The guide includes 13 detailed trail descriptions along with information on additional resources, governing agencies, and permits and fees.

“Best Backpacking Trips in Utah, Arizona, and New Mexico” | The second book in a series of detailed guidebooks covering all the best backpacking vacations in the spectacular back-country of the American West.

“50 Classic Hikes In Nevada” | Nevada boasts some of the most diverse and beautiful landscapes in North America and is rich in trails that embrace the state’s scenic, geologic and historic resources and this book features 50 of the best Nevada hikes ranging the state from the Mojave Desert to the Sierra Nevada, from sagebrush basins to the alpine heights of the Ruby Mountains.

“50 of the Best Strolls, Walks, and Hikes Around Carson City” | With more than 300 days of sunshine a year, this capital city’s parks, trails, lakes and soaring peaks provide the perfect attractions for residents and visitors alike.

“50 of the Best Snowshoe Trails Around Tahoe” | This book offers snowshoers of all levels and experience a range of excursions from flat and easy to steep and strenuous.

“50 of the Best Strolls, Walks, and Hikes around Reno” | This guide provides readers the most complete and detailed information for excursions from the Truckee River corridor to the Northern Valleys including lakes, parks, trails and mountains.

“Kings Canyon National Park” | The first comprehensive guide to the trails, campgrounds, outfitters and facilities in the park and its environs with trips to neighboring Giant Sequoia National Monument, Sierra National Forest and the Jennie Lakes and Monarch wilderness areas.

“Lassen Volcanic National Park” | This guide features more than 90 day hikes and backpacking trips to popular destinations for all levels including Lassen Peak, Bumpass Hell, Manzanita Lake, Boiling Springs Lake, Terminal Geyser and Cinder Cone.

“Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks” | With this comprehensive guide, discover the most spectacular wonders in Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks and hundreds of miles of trails to high mountain lakes, wildflower-covered meadows, cascading streams, deep forests and craggy peaks.

“Snowshoe Trails of Yosemite” | White describes the area’s best snowshoe trips, all chosen for their great scenery and easy accessibility.

“Trinity Alps and Vicinity” | The most comprehensive hiking guide to the Trinity Alps mountain range, which forms a rugged divide, tucked between the Coast Ranges and the Cascades in a half-million acres of wilderness.

“Top Trails: Lake Tahoe” | Explore 50 of the best trails for hiking and biking in the Tahoe area. The guide features the best hikes including the North Shore’s splendid backcountry, the Lake’s sedate Western side, the picturesque and popular areas on the South Shore, including Desolation Wilderness, and D. L. Bliss and Emerald Bay state parks and the relatively undeveloped Eastern side.

“Top Trails: Northern California’s Redwood Coast” | The definitive guidebook for the magnificent and beautifully mysterious hikers’ paradise of the Redwood Coast.

 

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Tahoe resources during COVID-19 https://thetahoeweekly.com/2020/04/tahoe-resources-during-covid-19/ Fri, 03 Apr 2020 19:10:53 +0000 https://thetahoeweekly.com/?p=57177 Local agencies are providing resources to the community and businesses during this critical time. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Resources from the CDC at https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-nCoV/index.html. City of South Lake Tahoe Resources for residents of South Lake Tahoe may be found at https://www.cityofslt.us/1075/COVID-19. This includes information on public health resources. Residents may also get updates […]

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Local agencies are providing resources to the community and businesses during this critical time.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Resources from the CDC at https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-nCoV/index.html.

City of South Lake Tahoe
Resources for residents of South Lake Tahoe may be found at https://www.cityofslt.us/1075/COVID-19. This includes information on public health resources. Residents may also get updates from the city: Text JOIN NEWS to 30890.

Douglas County
For residents of Douglas County, information and resources can be found at https://www.douglas.co.us/douglascovid19.

El Dorado County
Resources and information for residents of El Dorado County at https://www.edcgov.us/Government/hhsa/edccovid-19.

Nevada County
Resources and information for Nevada County residents at https://www.mynevadacounty.com/2924/Coronavirus

North Lake Tahoe
The North Lake Tahoe Resort Association has put together a community resource guide with information on community health resources, grocery store hours, local businesses services and hours, business and nonprofit resources, and much more. Visit https://www.nltra.org/north-lake-tahoecovid-19-community-update/.

They are also sharing regular updates through its Facebook page and blog. Sign up for e-communications here. For questions, email crisisinfo@gotahoenorth.com.

North Tahoe Business Association
Business and community resources are available at https://northtahoebusiness.org/covid19/.

Tahoe Chamber
Find business resources at https://tahoechamber.org/covid-19-business-resources/.

Tahoe City Downtown Association
Find community and business resources at https://visittahoecity.org/covid-19-resources. 

Town of Truckee
Community resources, updates and more at https://www.townoftruckee.com.

Washoe County 
Resources for Washoe County residents at https://covid19washoe.com/.

 

 

 

 

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Family at the heart of Mt. Rose https://thetahoeweekly.com/2020/04/family-at-the-heart-of-mt-rose/ Thu, 02 Apr 2020 19:33:20 +0000 https://thetahoeweekly.com/?p=57255 Full disclosure: Yours truly worked at Mt. Rose Ski Tahoe a decade ago from 2009 to 2013 and I still have many friends there. As a family-owned ski resort, being there truly did feel like I was in a family. I forged friendships with fellow lift operators, ski instructors and ski patrollers that extend well […]

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Courtesy Mt. Rose Ski Tahoe

Full disclosure: Yours truly worked at Mt. Rose Ski Tahoe a decade ago from 2009 to 2013 and I still have many friends there. As a family-owned ski resort, being there truly did feel like I was in a family. I forged friendships with fellow lift operators, ski instructors and ski patrollers that extend well beyond the resort. I have some unforgettable memories like the time we opened Winters Creek Lodge, participated in the New Year’s Eve fireworks show/torchlight parade, enjoyed my surprise birthday and danced all day in a tight, lime green ski suit on a snow stage for Retro Day.

Editor’s Note: While Mt. Rose closed for the season shortly after this story was written, Tahoe Weekly still feels it’s important to publish this feature online highlighting one of the region’s only independently owned downhill resorts. Read about Tahoe’s other independent resorts: Diamond Peak, Donner Ski Ranch, Granlibakken, Sky Tavern, Sugar Bowl and Tahoe Donner.

The day I decided to leave my job at Mt. Rose was heartbreaking, because I felt like I was disowning my family. It was one of the hardest decisions I made in my life. Was it worth giving up my weekly Chutes runs? The employee parties? The incredible snow? Truthfully, there are too many memories to fit into this space.

Fortunately, as more time passed after making my decision to leave, it felt like I just moved away. Because every time I go back to visit, the same people are still there. Marcia is still in Guest Services, Judit is still selling ski gear in 431 Sports, Paul is still the general manager, my old boss Mike is still in marketing, Cassie is still in ski patrol dispatch, the list goes on and on. And every time I see them, it’s like a reunion. I’m always greeted with open arms. This family bond that has been present for decades, which includes employees and Mt. Rose season passholders, is part of the reason why Mt. Rose has been successful for so long.

It all started when Swiss ski bootmaker Fritz Buser launched two major business endeavors in the 1960s:  a group of four-star hotels in the Swiss Alps called Sunstar that sold in 2009 and the other one in the United States, just outside of Reno called Mt. Rose. He became the majority shareholder of Mt. Rose in 1971, which at that time coexisted with Slide Mountain, now called the East Bowl of Mt. Rose.

Currently, the Buser family still maintains majority ownership. When Fritz passed away, his two sons Kurt and Rolf, as well as Fritz’s nephew Stefan, inherited the resort. Kurt acts as president and CEO and can often be spotted overseeing the operations during the ski season. So why has he stayed?

“Mt. Rose is fortunate in a unique way. It is so close to Reno and our elevation offers consistent snow,” Kurt says, reiterating the resort’s tagline of having the highest mountain base in Tahoe. “Those two are the stabilizing elements that have kept us so successful.”

“We have every degree of terrain that appeals to every type of skier or snowboarder. We’re close to Reno and we have Tahoe’s highest base, which means consistently good snow. All those elements – A, B and C – keep us churning away and attracting guests,” Marketing Director Mike Pierce chimes in.

Its proximity to a major ski market and is an important element, but there are also other factors that come together to create the perfect (snow)storm and keep its clientele happy.

“The vibe keeps a lot of our passholders coming back. There’s a spirit here that you can’t find anywhere else,” Pierce says.

“It’s fun and different every day. And every season is different,” Buser says.

The average tenure for a seasonal employee is five years (and Mt. Rose hires up to 700 people a year), while year-round employees tend to stay an average of 15 years. Overall, Mt. Rose has a 67 percent return rate. Pierce is currently in his 26th season at Mt. Rose.

When asked why he has stayed so long, he replies, “It’s the vibe, the atmosphere. Mt. Rose doesn’t have a corporate coldness to it like other resorts can have … this is a warm, dynamic place. The comradery that develops here, you don’t see that everywhere … and not to mention, it’s a fun place to ski.”

While Mt. Rose has had its fair share of challenging years – like before snowmaking and hill grooming came on the scene – the 200-acre black diamond and expert terrain Chutes opening was an industry gamechanger.

“I believe Mt. Rose’s golden years were the first two years of opening the Chutes. Those were great snow years and no one in the area opened up anything more attractive at that time. In the next few years when we open Atoma, that will be the Chutes for the new generation,” Kurt says. | skirose.com


 

 

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It takes a (Incline) Village to run Diamond Peak https://thetahoeweekly.com/2020/04/it-takes-a-incline-village-to-run-diamond-peak/ Thu, 02 Apr 2020 19:20:58 +0000 https://thetahoeweekly.com/?p=57248 On an uncrowded sunny day at Diamond Peak Ski Resort, I ride up the Crystal quad with three members of the Cruising Geezers Club, two super seniors and a senior from Reno who follow three rules when they ski: 1) they only ski on sunny days; 2) they only ski groomers; and 3) they pick […]

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Courtesy Diamond Peak

On an uncrowded sunny day at Diamond Peak Ski Resort, I ride up the Crystal quad with three members of the Cruising Geezers Club, two super seniors and a senior from Reno who follow three rules when they ski: 1) they only ski on sunny days; 2) they only ski groomers; and 3) they pick runs where they can ski right up to the next chairlift and don’t have to walk.

This group used to have season passes at other resorts but adopted Diamond Peak in recent years because its quality of snow, lack of crowds and season pass prices.

Editor’s Note: While Diamond Peak closed for the season shortly after this story was written, Tahoe Weekly still feels it’s important to publish this feature online highlighting one of the region’s only independently owned downhill resorts. Read about Tahoe’s other independent resorts: Donner Ski Ranch, Granlibakken, Mt. Rose, Sky Tavern, Sugar Bowl and Tahoe Donner.

“We ski midweek and can’t beat this place. This is a neighborhood ski area; come on the weekends and this place is crawling with kids. But as retired super seniors who have time on our hands, Diamond Peak has the cheapest pass in Tahoe,” one of them says. With that, we all unload the chairlift and take off down the Crystal Ridge run, notoriously known for its incredible views of Lake Tahoe.

So how does Diamond Peak stay in business when it’s so affordable? Well, Diamond Peak is unique in the sense that it’s not private, independent or managed by a corporation. Rather, it’s owned by the community.

When people purchase property in Incline Village or Crystal Bay, they pay a yearly recreation fee to the Incline Village General Improvement District. In turn, they receive discounts on local amenities including two golf courses, a tennis center, a recreation center and the 655-acre ski area. The revenue that Diamond Peak brings in is then put back into the IVGID Community Services fund for capital improvements and maintenance on all IVGID facilities.

After 36 years at Diamond Peak, General Manager Mike Bandelin says that he is grateful to have the ability to provide a level of service that he says can only be done by being a smaller, community-owned ski resort.

“I think being small allows me to go out and regularly talk to the lift maintenance crew and employees, and they all know my name. I like being close to our customers and can get direct feedback from them to share with the (IVGID Board of Trustees) to be able to manage the resort appropriately,” he says. What has kept Diamond Peak alive all these years, Bandelin believes, is always adjusting to the demands and wants of its daily skiers and passholders.

“People tell me it’s the price (to ski at Diamond Peak), but I disagree with them. I think it’s the amenities we provide – the quality of snow, friendliness of the staff, safety. Plus, by being small we can refine season pass perks to cater to our passholders,” he says.

However, Bandelin adds that it helps having the support from the District to get through any lean or low-snow years.

“Because this ski area is community owned, we have access to capital expense funds to maintain Diamond Peak’s infrastructure and equipment. The District, and community, provides ways to maintain it,” Bandelin says. The District’s control has allowed the resort to make upgrades to facilities, provide snowmaking enhancements and perform regular maintenance no matter what Mother Nature decides to do.

Everything that Diamond Peak stands for is what Incline Village resident Mike Matteo loves about his local ski area.

“I live 60 seconds down the road and when I’m bored, I can get here so fast. It takes me 10 to 15 minutes to get my boots on and be on the chairlift, whereas at other resorts it can take 10 to 15 minutes just to park my car and wait for the shuttle to come.

“There are no crowds, you can’t beat the views, and everyone is super friendly. You can tell that they’re out here to have fun, not just putting in their time to move up the corporate ladder. They built a big park this year and changed it up a few times, it’s really cool that they do that,” he says.

He bought his IVGID resident midweek season pass, which came with perks that are valuable to him, like a significant discount on food and drinks and lift tickets at other resorts in the area that match his style of riding.

“To get 12 days at local resorts like Boreal, Donner Ski Ranch and Homewood and then get deals at Copper, Colorado, and Montana … they have partners all over the place. To get all that for $319, it’s unreal,” he says.

“Diamond Peak is my favorite resort in Tahoe and the most underrated. A bunch of us rode another resort for 10 years, but now we all come here,” Matteo says. | diamondpeak.com


 

 

 

 

 

 

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Artists selected for East Shore Trail mural https://thetahoeweekly.com/2020/03/artists-selected-for-east-shore-trail-mural/ Tue, 31 Mar 2020 18:52:29 +0000 https://thetahoeweekly.com/?p=57235 Tyler Rivenbark and Frida Ticehurst-Rivenbark, a husband and wife art and design duo based in North Lake Tahoe, were selected to paint their mural concept in the tunnel on the Tahoe East Shore Trail by a panel of judges composed of representatives from the Tahoe Fund, Tahoe Public Art, Nevada State Parks, Nevada Department of […]

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Courtesy Tahoe Fund

Tyler Rivenbark and Frida Ticehurst-Rivenbark, a husband and wife art and design duo based in North Lake Tahoe, were selected to paint their mural concept in the tunnel on the Tahoe East Shore Trail by a panel of judges composed of representatives from the Tahoe Fund, Tahoe Public Art, Nevada State Parks, Nevada Department of Transportation, Raley’s, and Kelly Brothers Painting. Raley’s is providing a $5,000 stipend to the artists and Kelly Brothers Painting will donate all of the paint required for the mural.

Submissions came from as far as the United Kingdom and Canada with the majority coming from local and regional artists.

“Our partners and sponsors held two panel meetings in February to determine the top three artists,” said Marina Lowe, program administrator for Tahoe Public Art, in a press release. “Factors we considered included the artists’ concepts for community involvement, overall design, budget and maintenance.”

Tyler RivenbarkFrida Ticehurst-Rivenbark

Most of Rivenbark’s work involves mixed media. Ticehurst-Rivenbark’s art practice focuses on sustainable and regenerative systems for creative expression.

“Our intent with this art piece is to convey the natural beauty of this region,” said the couple in the press release. “We want to remind people of the gift we all share by living or visiting this region, amplifying the sense of belonging, and encouraging participation in keeping this place beautiful and full of enjoyment.”

Painting of the mural begins later this spring following NDOT approval of the permitting process. Local youth involvement is also expected, pending the status of government regulations related to COVID-19. When painting is under way, the Tahoe East Shore Trail will be closed for 2 to 3 days by NDOT and Nevada State Parks. | tahoefund.org

 

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Tahoe Maritime Museum to shutter, reorganize https://thetahoeweekly.com/2020/03/tahoe-maritime-museum-to-shutter-reorganize/ Tue, 31 Mar 2020 18:40:26 +0000 https://thetahoeweekly.com/?p=57241 The Tahoe Maritime Museum Board of Directors announced on March 31 that is will be restructuring the nonprofit into a maritime foundation and will sell its properties in Tahoe City and Homewood and distribute its collections to museums or through public sale. “Over the coming months, TMM will initiate the protocol required to distribute the […]

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Courtesy Tahoe Maritime Museum

The Tahoe Maritime Museum Board of Directors announced on March 31 that is will be restructuring the nonprofit into a maritime foundation and will sell its properties in Tahoe City and Homewood and distribute its collections to museums or through public sale.

“Over the coming months, TMM will initiate the protocol required to distribute the artifact and archival collections to relevant museums and nonprofits around Lake Tahoe, Northern California and the greater United States. Any items from the collection not relocated to another organization will go to public sale. Both the Museum’s Tahoe City and Homewood properties will be listed for sale. The Board of Directors intends to establish an endowed foundation that will continue to preserve maritime history,” wrote Bud Bensley, president of the Board, in an email.

The Museum is currently closed due to COVID-19, and it is uncertain that the museum will reopen following the closure.

“The Tahoe Maritime Museum Board of Directors has announced plans to change the course of the Museum,” wrote Bensley. “Throughout 2020, the nonprofit will be reorganizing into a maritime foundation. The Museum is proud of the numerous exhibitions, educational programs and the thousands of visitors it has welcomed into the Museum over the last 20 years. However, due to our changing community interests and decreasing philanthropic support, the Museum is unable to meet its annual fundraising goals to support a physical museum within the Tahoe Basin.” | tahoemaritimemuseum.org

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The Judgement of Napa, Part II https://thetahoeweekly.com/2020/03/the-judgement-of-napa-part-ii/ Tue, 31 Mar 2020 18:36:45 +0000 https://thetahoeweekly.com/?p=57230 The setting is Paris, May 24, 1976, and the wines are here, and the judges – eight French, one Brit and one American – are here, as well. And, so the Royal Rumble begins. To get the true vibe, picture Lions VS. Human’s day at the Roman Coliseum, with the French decidedly being the big […]

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Courtesy Lou Phillips

The setting is Paris, May 24, 1976, and the wines are here, and the judges – eight French, one Brit and one American – are here, as well. And, so the Royal Rumble begins.

To get the true vibe, picture Lions VS. Human’s day at the Roman Coliseum, with the French decidedly being the big cats. Matter of fact the betting line was probably better for the Homo Sapiens in question in ancient Rome.

Read Part I.

The sole media attendee from the U.S. was George Taber of Time Magazine, who said everyone had been invited, but expecting a butt-kicking of the Californians, only he accepted.

And now, the Contestants.

In the Red, White and Blue Corner

Chardonnays: 1973 Chateau Montelena, 1974 Chalone Vineyard, 1973 Spring Mountain Vineyard, 1972 Freemark Abbey Winery, 1972 Veedercrest Vineyards and 1973 David Bruce Winery.

Cabernet Sauvignons: 1973 Stag’s Leap Wine Cellars, 1971 Ridge Monte Bello, 1970 Heitz Wine Cellars Martha’s Vineyard, 1972 Clos du Val Winery, 1971 Mayacamas Vineyards, 1969 Freemark Abbey Winery.

And in the Blue, White and Red Corner

Chardonnays AKA White Burgundy: 1973 Roulot Meursault, 1973 1973 Joseph Drouhin Beaune Clos de Mouches, 1973 Ramonet-Prudhon Batard-Montrachet, 1972 Domaine Laflaive Puligny-Montrachet Les Pucelles.

Cabernets Sauvignon Bordeaux Blends: 1970 Chateau Mouton-Rothschild, 1970 Chateau Haut-Brion, 1970 Chateau Montrose, 1971 Chateau Leoville Les Cases.

The White Wine Winner was the Chateau Montelena Chardonnay, with Americans also taking spots 3 and 4. The Red Wine Winner was the 1973 Stag’s Leap Wine Cellars Cabernet Sauvignon.

In the interest of space, I will not name all the judges but will highlight the most outrageous, and outraged, of their reactions.

Outraged by the fairness of it all, one Odette Kahn, the editor of La Revue du Vin de France having judged the Americans superior, demanded her ballot back.

Suddenly, the aforementioned Mr. Faber was glad he came. When his Time Magazine article ran, Sacre Bleu, did the pooh pooh ever hit the ventilateur.

With a run up of only a few decades the yanks were undeniably in the same league with the Chateau and Domaines with a several hundred year head start.

Even the European wine press, famously heretofore in the pockets of the French wine industry, were forced to give American wines an occasional horn-toot. The wine lists of European restaurants started featuring more than a few California wines, and any objective wine lover anywhere could not be taken seriously if they left U.S.’s best out of their tastings and cellars.

Can’t you just hear “America the Beautiful” ringing in your ears? Next, Part Trois.

 

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