Tahoe Weekly https://thetahoeweekly.com Lake Tahoe's Complete Events, Entertainment, Recreation, Dining, Art guide Mon, 21 Oct 2019 16:38:27 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.2.4 https://thetahoeweekly.com/files/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/cropped-SiteIcon_Tahoe-2-32x32.png Tahoe Weekly https://thetahoeweekly.com 32 32 Truckee Community Gears Up for Christmas https://thetahoeweekly.com/2019/10/truckee-community-gears-up-for-christmas/ Mon, 21 Oct 2019 16:37:43 +0000 https://thetahoeweekly.com/?p=55253 Truckee Community Christmas invites locals to plan ahead and contribute to the town’s ripple-effect of kindness. The nonprofit’s board members work with area schools and agencies such as the Family Resource Center of Truckee and Project MANA now part of Sierra Community House, to identify local individuals and families who are struggling to make ends […]

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Courtesy Truckee Community Christmas

Truckee Community Christmas invites locals to plan ahead and contribute to the town’s ripple-effect of kindness. The nonprofit’s board members work with area schools and agencies such as the Family Resource Center of Truckee and Project MANA now part of Sierra Community House, to identify local individuals and families who are struggling to make ends meet.

Beginning Nov. 30, almost 50 locations in Truckee will feature donation bins for the community to conveniently drop off items to be delivered to low-income families, teenage moms and their babies and low-income and homebound seniors in our community.

It’s easy to get involved this year. Simply donate clean, gently used, warm winter coats or purchase them new for people of all ages and sizes. Coats are accepted at Church of the Mountains in downtown Truckee and at Tahoe Forest Church on Hirschdale Road.

Pick up extra nonperishable food items and dried pantry staples to help make meals easier. Food items can be dropped off at Safeway, SaveMart and La Galleria.

The toy drive features almost 20 locations around town where fun gifts can be dropped off. The Web site features complete list of drop-off locations for the coat, toy and food drives.

Those seeking volunteer opportunities sorting and packing donated items, can join Truckee Community Christmas members in the small gym at the Tahoe Truckee Unified School District office on Dec. 12 and 13 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.

For those who prefer to give a tax-deductible contribution, checks can be mailed to Truckee Community Christmas, P.O. Box 2955, Truckee, CA 96160. | (530) 587-2757, truckeecommunitychristmas.com


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Tahoe’s fiery fall display https://thetahoeweekly.com/2019/10/tahoes-fiery-fall-display/ Wed, 16 Oct 2019 19:00:43 +0000 https://thetahoeweekly.com/?p=55126 The fall colors are still exploding in fiery bursts of reds and golds, setting the mountainsides ablaze well into mid=October; which is late for the season in the Tahoe Sierra. We feature two great outings in this issue to explore and enjoy the fall display – Snowshoe Thompson Cave near Hope Valley and the Moraine […]

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Cottonwood trees display their fall colors along the Truckee River at the west end of downtown Truckee. Photography by Scott Thompson | ScottShotsPhoto.com, @ScottShotsPhoto

The fall colors are still exploding in fiery bursts of reds and golds, setting the mountainsides ablaze well into mid=October; which is late for the season in the Tahoe Sierra.

We feature two great outings in this issue to explore and enjoy the fall display – Snowshoe Thompson Cave near Hope Valley and the Moraine Trail at Fallen Leaf Lake in South Lake Tahoe. Find more fall outings at TheTahoeWeekly.com; click on Out & About: Fall.

It’s also time for lots of family friendly and adult-themed Halloween parties and events throughout the region from trick or treating for the tykes to all-night Halloween bashes and, of course, a showing of the “Rocky Horror Picture Show.” Find the details in this edition and online; click on Event Calendar.

The ski season is getting closer as Mt. Rose Ski Tahoe has been blasting its snowmaking guns with a planned Oct. 25 opening; weather permitting. To whet your appetite for the season, check out the latest news on the mountain at Northstar, Boreal and Squaw (hint: you can get a free pass), or check out one of the ski film showings coming to Tahoe. For a list of all of the latest ski resort opening dates, visit TheTahoeWeekly.com; click on Out & About: Winter.


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Steve Poltz | One-Man Musical Comet https://thetahoeweekly.com/2019/10/steve-poltz-one-man-musical-comet/ Wed, 16 Oct 2019 18:59:55 +0000 https://thetahoeweekly.com/?p=55130 Believe it or not, the ageless wonder, musician and multitalented entertainer, Steve Poltz, turns 60 next year. “Age ain’t nothing but a number,” says the effervescent artist originally from Nova Scotia. “It really means nothing. I’m walking up the stairs at the house right now and I’m asking myself, ‘Am I just tired or old?’ […]

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Laura Partain

Believe it or not, the ageless wonder, musician and multitalented entertainer, Steve Poltz, turns 60 next year.

“Age ain’t nothing but a number,” says the effervescent artist originally from Nova Scotia. “It really means nothing. I’m walking up the stairs at the house right now and I’m asking myself, ‘Am I just tired or old?’ In my mind, I still feel like I’m 20.”

Hangtown Music Festival | El Dorado County Fairgrounds
Oct. 25 | 2:15 p.m. & Oct. 26 | 6:30 & 9:15 p.m.

It’s true. Keeping up with Poltz on tour, around the house, on the phone or during one of his many concerts across the world each year will compel you to dig deep into your physical and spiritual energy reserves. He doesn’t seem to waste a second, like some force of nature blowing through this weary world in an unaltered biological state, intent on leaving joy and creation in his inescapable path.

“My personal life is in total disarray. I tour way too hard. I’m way out of balance, but I love it. Everybody tells me I’m crazy and insane, but … it gives me energy.”

— Steve Poltz

“The people with me get tired,” says Poltz. “They hate me. My personal life is in total disarray. I tour way too hard. I’m way out of balance, but I love it. Everybody tells me I’m crazy and insane, but I really like it and it gives me energy.”

Poltz truly wants to meet you, get to know you, try to understand you for even one twinkling instant and, most likely at the very least, sing a song with you. His intimate live performances are chockful of stories to make you laugh and cry, masterly crafted songs from any of his 13 albums and group sing-alongs on classic tunes we all know and love. Chances are by the end of the performance he won’t be on stage, but in the audience with you and your 100 new friends making magic and laughter together.

“I look at younger bands that go out once a year for a month,” he says. “They look at my schedule and ask, ‘How are you doing this?’ I still get excited when I see these upcoming gigs. Most people get jaded but not me.”

In fact, it’s Poltz’s organic condition to be stoked.

“I get excited about stuff,” he says. “I’m not posing doing it. I wonder what kind of cool hipster coffeehouse there is where you live. What records stores are there? Who are we going to meet?”

In a past life, after Poltz’s family had left Canada for California, he befriended a barista named Jewel and co-wrote the song, “You Were Meant for Me,” which hit No. 2 on the Billboard Charts in 1996.

“When I was younger I was getting huge checks, stupid checks that I had no business getting,” he says. “I once got a check for $155,000.”

While those days are over, Poltz was recently delighted to wander out to his mailbox and find a $120 check of royalties for “Million Miles.” It’s a song that he and Jewel wrote more than 20 years ago, which was recently discovered and recorded by virtuosic bluegrass guitarist Molly Tuttle for the opening track on her critically acclaimed sophomore album, “When You’re Ready.”

Poltz calls friends and collaborators such as Tuttle and 27-year-old Billy Strings, who live nearby his East Nashville neighborhood, “super-virus kids, the kind that you can’t get rid of, that can outlive the penicillin,” he jokes. “A lot of them never grew up not knowing there wasn’t YouTube with all these songs at their disposal. When I was growing up, all we could compare it to was putting on a Beatles record and playing along to it over and over. They’re Beatles mixed with Oasis mixed with Led Zeppelin. They’re learning at a quicker clip. They’re like larger, faster athletes — kind of like Tiger Woods was raised to play golf or [15-year-old tennis phenom] Coco Gauff. You can grow up into skating and punk-rock music and also into loving Doc Watson.”

Since moving to Tennessee three years ago at the encouragement of his girlfriend, Poltz has been writing and recording with other artists more than ever. And it looks like it’s all uphill from here.

“It’s a really exciting time to be in music,” he says. “We’ve got everything at our fingertips. We don’t sell CDs. No one is going to be living off royalties. We gotta go out on the road and earn it. A lot of people don’t want to work that hard, but I picked the perfect job. I still care so much.”

He will perform at the ninth annual Hangtown Music Festival at the El Dorado County Fairgrounds in Placerville, which runs from Oct. 24 to 27, alongside artists such as Railroad Earth, Greensky Bluegrass, Anders Osborne, The Wood Brothers, Lindsay Lou and many more. | hangtownfestival.com


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Flying High in Tahoe’s treetops https://thetahoeweekly.com/2019/10/flying-high-in-tahoes-treetops/ Wed, 16 Oct 2019 18:57:13 +0000 https://thetahoeweekly.com/?p=55133 I grew up surrounded by oak and willow trees that have strong, low-lying branches that are perfect for climbing. Like many kids, I spent hours climbing and hanging out in trees. I felt a sense of freedom climbing higher and higher on the branches hoping to get close enough to touch the sky. The Tahoe […]

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Treetop Adventure Park | Michelle Allen

I grew up surrounded by oak and willow trees that have strong, low-lying branches that are perfect for climbing. Like many kids, I spent hours climbing and hanging out in trees. I felt a sense of freedom climbing higher and higher on the branches hoping to get close enough to touch the sky. The Tahoe Sierra can be a tough place to find a tree to climb because many of them are pine trees with high branches not easily reached from the ground.

High above the ground at Tahoe City Treetop. | Michelle Allen

My son Anikin has not had much experience climbing trees. Tahoe City Treetop, a ropes course that puts the participants high up in the large native pine and red cedar trees, was a solution; my son was able to climb to new heights.

I was eager to take Anikin to one of the treetop courses. There are three locations: Tahoe City Treetop, Squaw Valley Treetop and Tahoe Vista Treetop. I felt he was ready at 6 years old. I arranged for my husband Luke and Anikin to have a session at the Tahoe City Treetop course at Granlibakken Tahoe.

Getting the kids ready for a treetop adventure. | Michelle Allen

It was a pleasantly cool fall day and we arrived to see people working through obstacles and cruising on zip lines high in the trees above our heads. We checked in and the two were fitted with gear. Anikin was quiet and attentive as the staff adjusted his harness and gave him instructions on how the trolley mechanism works and how to engage and disengage from the course’s continuous cable.

After an extensive safety talk by one of the knowledgeable and friendly climbing staff, Anikin made one lap on the practice course to get checked out. He breezed through it and passed his test. He was anxious to check out the real courses. The Tahoe City course has 97 tree platforms with 60 ramps and various styles of suspension bridges. There are 27 zip lines ranging in length from 30 to 200 feet. The obstacles range in construction and difficulty but deliver big for seekers of high-flying adventure, like my guys Anikin and Luke.

Anikin Allen enjoying the course. | Michelle Allen

On recommendation from the staff, they started on a beginner course just past the practice course. It starts low to the ground and is a great introduction to basic course features. Anikin was timid at first and cautiously analyzed each obstacle. He watched Luke as he quickly and effortlessly glided across to the other side. Once he reached the other side, Luke turned back and yelled, “All clear!” to let Anikin know it was his turn.

Anikin was a bit hesitant, but with some encouraging words from his dad, he completed the task at hand. He moved through the course and became more and more confident. They finished their first course and Anikin was ready to tackle an intermediate course.

With each course he completed, Anikin was more sure of himself and he and Luke spent the next couple of hours conquering courses such as Fuzzy Bunny, Zipper and Rainbow. One of Anikin’s favorites is named Snowboard because he rode a snowboard across a suspension line.

When their time was up, Anikin didn’t want to leave but Luke promised to bring him back the following weekend.

Tahoe City Treetop has two beginner, six intermediate and two advanced courses. Anikin was not tall enough to do the advanced courses, which I understand are difficult and require a good bit of core strength.

Treetop’s three locations each have beginner, intermediate and advanced courses but are unique with different features and obstacles. Tahoe Vista’s courses are slightly more advanced than Tahoe City’s; Squaw Valley is considered the most advanced.

Participants must be 5 years old. To go on the advanced courses, participants must be 49 inches tall. The courses in Tahoe City and Tahoe Vista have 2.5 hour sessions. The sessions are self-guided; staff monitor from the ground. | tahoetreetop.com


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Fiery fall display at Snowshoe Thompson’s Cave https://thetahoeweekly.com/2019/10/fiery-fall-display-at-snowshoe-thompsons-cave/ Wed, 16 Oct 2019 18:56:45 +0000 https://thetahoeweekly.com/?p=55139 You’re probably familiar with John “Snowshoe” Thompson and his legendary ability to brave the harshest winter conditions while crossing the Sierra delivering the mail, but have you ever wondered how he did it during a blizzard? Thompson would often seek shelter in overhanging rocks and caves. One of his well-documented shelters is easily accessible. The […]

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Snowshoe Thompson sought refuge from winter weather in the cave. | Lisa Michelle

You’re probably familiar with John “Snowshoe” Thompson and his legendary ability to brave the harshest winter conditions while crossing the Sierra delivering the mail, but have you ever wondered how he did it during a blizzard? Thompson would often seek shelter in overhanging rocks and caves. One of his well-documented shelters is easily accessible. The shelter is more perfectly placed slabs and boulders than cave and sits only steps off Highway 88 in Hope Valley. About a quarter mile from the trailhead up Carson Canyon you can crawl in and relax under the massive granite overhang.

Soot darkened the walls of the sanctuary; it was easy to imagine Thompson warming his hands by the fire, chewing a piece of jerked beef and looking out at the raw beauty of a winter storm.

The path begins opposite Horsethief Canyon Trail. There is plenty of parking and I recommend taking time to read the California National Historic Trail signs that explain the historic value of the Carson Route and Snowshoe Thompson. It set the mood as I began my jaunt. Crisp leaves underfoot and scents of autumn worked their magic on me and turned this brief side trip into an adventure.

Read Mark McLaughlin’s history of Snowshoe Thompson.

I could have rushed up the trail in 10 minutes but found myself spellbound by the spirit of Snowshoe Thompson and what he would have endured with a 100-pound rucksack on his back. Halfway up the trail a tiny spring bubbled and gurgled in the tawny grass. It was the perfect place to test my new water filter straw and ponder the hardy souls who may have slurped these waters. Two women approached as I knelt alongside the spring and sucked on my straw.

Snowshoe Thompson.

“I have extra water,” one offered.

“Pumpkin spiced latte?” The other lifted her cup as if she’d share.

“I’m good, thanks.” I stood — considered explaining but asked what they thought of the cave.

“We’re from Oklahoma and can’t even imagine crossing these mountains — especially in winter,” one said. I could smell the pumpkin spice on her breath and wished them well.

Along the trail to Snowshoe Thompson Cave. | Lisa Michelle

Farther up the trail, trees thinned and granite grew. Suddenly, the unmistakable ancient refuge built like a shoddy Stonehenge came into view. I climbed the boulder gates and went inside. Soot darkened the walls of the sanctuary; it was easy to imagine Thompson warming his hands by the fire, chewing a piece of jerked beef and looking out at the raw beauty of a winter storm. The benefits of solitude reminded me of a place not far from here where a few years ago I thought I spotted a wolf. Certain I was mistaken; I asked a few locals. Some confessed they had seen a lone wolf wandering Hope Valley. California Fish and Wildlife convinced me I was wrong, but the event is still vivid — especially at dusk.

“I was never frightened but once during all my travels in the mountains. That was in the winter of 1857. I was crossing Hope Valley, when I came to a place where six great wolves — big timber wolves — were at work in the snow, digging out the carcass of some animal. They were great, gaunt, shaggy fellows,” said Thompson, adding that he approached the wolves.

They left the carcass and in single file came to within 25 yards from him. They all crouched with “every eye and every sharp nose” toward him. But what frightened him most was the confidence they displayed. Thompson dared not show fear. He held his breath and skied past them. The dominant wolf let forth a loud, eerie howl and the others joined in, but Thompson did not panic, and the wolves did not pursue.

The view from inside Snowshoe Thompson Cave. | Lisa Michelle

Unless you prefer to brave the elements as Thompson did it’s best to visit the cave in fall. The area is famous for its fiery red and gold shimmering aspens. The canyons here are alive with color this time of year as foliage exhales a last breath and prepares for winter.

From Lake Tahoe take Highway 89 toward Hope Valley then head east (left) on Highway 88. Just past the Hope Valley Café look for the Horsethief Canyon Parking on the north side (left) of Highway 88. Drive time from South Lake Tahoe is about 30 to 40 minutes. | alltrails.com


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Claire Lawrenson | Capturing nature through watercolors https://thetahoeweekly.com/2019/10/claire-lawrenson-capturing-nature-through-watercolors/ Wed, 16 Oct 2019 18:55:27 +0000 https://thetahoeweekly.com/?p=55145 Meeting Claire Lawrenson for the first time invoked the same feeling I had when I first saw her Wild + Wistful Studio greeting cards: They struck me as purely lovely and effervescent. Lawrenson can capture a simplicity and naturalness in her subjects and use her creative eye to translate that to beautiful greeting cards that […]

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Mount Tallac Sunset and the tools of the trade. | Claire Lawrenson

Meeting Claire Lawrenson for the first time invoked the same feeling I had when I first saw her Wild + Wistful Studio greeting cards: They struck me as purely lovely and effervescent. Lawrenson can capture a simplicity and naturalness in her subjects and use her creative eye to translate that to beautiful greeting cards that are sure to bring a smile to one’s face.

The front of two of her cards read, “You are one in a million” and “Have a stellar birthday,” in a whimsical font against a starry winter sky. “Hello from Truckee” another reads, with a watercolor portrait of a snowy mountain peak and Donner Lake glistening in the background.

“What I like about watercolor over anything else is that I want it messy, but I also want it to be perfect. I consider myself a sloppy perfectionist.”

–CLAIRE LAWRENSON

Originally from Ripon, Lawrenson moved to South Lake Tahoe to be closer to her sister and work at Heavenly Mountain Resort as a snowboard instructor. In 2012, she moved to Truckee with her husband and three years later took a watercolor class at Atelier Truckee. She had previously dabbled in sketching, acrylic painting and drawing; she studied interior design in college, but after trying watercolors, she became obsessed.

Sketching Eagle Lake, Desolation Wilderness in September. | Claire Lawrenson

“What I like about watercolor over anything else is that I want it messy, but I also want it to be perfect. I consider myself a sloppy perfectionist,” she says.

While practicing watercolor painting, Lawrenson also became inspired by the fellow makers and crafters around her who were doing their own thing and willing to share their knowledge. For instance, Lawrenson credits jewelry maker Krista Tranquilla for helping Lawrenson turn her watercolor hobby into a business after Tranquilla taught a Sierra Business Council class on how to use Etsy.

 

She also took a watercolor class at Sierra College and in April 2018, decided to take on a personal challenge by posting a piece of art on Instagram for 100 days, tagged #100daysofartinspiredbynature.

Sketching at Cathedral Valley, Capitol Reef National Park, Utah, in May.
| Jes Albery

“It was a lot of effort and a lot of work. I would forget to post [on some days]. But then around Day 45 it became a habit,” she says.

Lawrenson would work on her art during lunch breaks, during hikes, from her kayak or on chairlifts and by the end of the 100 days she was enjoying the process.

“I saw a lot of progress in my sketching and painting,” she says. “It definitely changed the way I look at art and it improved my skills. I did feel self-conscious about putting it out there at first. I was releasing things that I wasn’t necessarily happy about. But I found that people liked this project; my friends said they enjoyed seeing what I was doing every day and that helped me be less hard on myself. I notice [her progress] but it surprised me that others notice that, as well.

Claire Lawrenson in Olympic Valley. | Joanna Rutkowski

“I do a lot of hiking, camping and snowboarding. I’m inspired by the scenery around us and the activities I do. When I was doing the 100 Days of Outside project, I was sketching outside more. When I started out, I was thinking, ‘What would make a good card?’ and then I would paint and make a card out of it. I have basic sayings, but then I try to think of ones that are more interesting. I’ll write down a bunch of ideas and send them to my sister and good friend for approval.”

Working with TIP Printing & Graphics in Truckee, Lawrenson was able to find Forest Stewardship Council — certified carbon-neutral paper to print her greeting cards on that are tucked into plant-based, biodegradable sleeves.

Her favorite thing to paint is mountain scenes and wildflowers and she is constantly improving and adding more detail. Since Wild + Wistful Studio’s launch, Lawrenson has started teaching watercolor workshops a few times a month at Atelier to share her passion with other people.

“I have a travel-sized sketch kit and small box of paints and I take that with me pretty much every time I hike. Whenever we get to the destination, I like to stop and sketch the view. It’s a fun way of remembering where I’ve gone,” she says.

Wild + Wistful Studio greeting cards are sold at Bespoke in Truckee, Trunk Show in Tahoe City, Blue Wolf Studios in Kings Beach, and Wildwood Makers Market in South Lake Tahoe. | wildandwistfulstudio.com


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Couple releases “Pow and Chow” | Plant-based cookbook for powder days https://thetahoeweekly.com/2019/10/couple-releases-pow-and-chow-plant-based-cookbook-for-powder-days/ Wed, 16 Oct 2019 18:54:10 +0000 https://thetahoeweekly.com/?p=55151 Quirky, outdoorsy illustrator Hannah Eddy and her husband Tim Eddy have been busy over the past year snowboarding, skateboarding, playing music, travelling and creating art, but the pair is also into sustainable cooking. They recently released a cookbook, “Pow and Chow: Plant-based Recipes for Ripping.” Watch Tim’s “Pow and Chow” video Read Kayla’s profile on […]

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Pumpkin Oats. | Hannah Eddy

Quirky, outdoorsy illustrator Hannah Eddy and her husband Tim Eddy have been busy over the past year snowboarding, skateboarding, playing music, travelling and creating art, but the pair is also into sustainable cooking. They recently released a cookbook, “Pow and Chow: Plant-based Recipes for Ripping.”

Watch Tim’s “Pow and Chow” video
Read Kayla’s profile on Hannah Eddy and her artwork.

Tim and Hannah have been talking about writing a cookbook for years. The idea began to form legs after Tim released a series of funny, short cooking videos on YouTube called “Pow and Chow.” In one 5-minute episode titled “Truck Yeah,” he makes hot and hearty oatmeal out of the back of his truck before riding powder at Mt. Baker Ski Area and ends his day back in the truck with a four-ingredient, one-pot Thai dinner.

The Eddys decided that creating a plant-based cookbook with all the proceeds of it going to Protect Our Winters would be a great step to help powder-hound snowboarders learn how to cook and decrease their carbon footprints.

“Nothin’ better than a pot of oats filled with all sorts of deliciousness and nutritious-ness. All right, now we’re getting breakfast out of the way. Let’s bash,” he says in the beginning of the video.

Tim was passionate about cooking even back when he was 13 years old. He realized how important it was to eat healthy in order to keep up with his active lifestyle.

Tim Eddy makes spring rolls out of their truck at a hot spring in the Eastern Sierra. | Hannah Eddy

Hannah experimented with baking after college while working at various pizza places and a cookie shop. She met Tim at the High Cascade Snowboard Camp in Oregon in 2007 and together they opened a food truck called Pizza Party in 2011. They made and sold three kinds of grilled personal pizzas along with chocolate-chip cookies. They sourced ingredients from the local commissary and farmers’ markets with the goal of bringing healthy food to campers.

“We learned a lot and had fun. People still ask where Pizza Party is,” Hannah says.

After the Eddys moved to Truckee, they thought more about how to integrate cooking into their lifestyle, which is where “Pow and Chow” was born. About two years ago, the couple adopted a plant-based diet and she says that both she and Tim feel amazing.

“Tim had a lot of reoccurring injuries and after three weeks [of eating a plant-based diet], his tendonitis went away,” Hannah says.

Through their research, they realized that the meat and dairy Tim was consuming was causing inflammation; coming up with recipes void of those ingredients greatly improved their health.

“We had a lot of fun experimenting and our friends were interested in it, but they didn’t know where to start,” Hannah says. “So, we came up with these plant-based recipes for ripping” she says.

Tim and Hannah Eddy

What sets the Eddys apart from the other vegan-based athletes/low-key chefs out there is that they aren’t preachy or out to lecture people about their diets. Spend five minutes with either of them and you immediately understand that you are free to eat what you want.

Since many people are receptive to Tim’s lighthearted approach, the Eddys decided that creating a plant-based cookbook with all the proceeds going to Protect Our Winters (POW) would be a great step in helping powder-hound snowboarders learn how to cook and to help decrease carbon footprints.

“The main reason for going vegan was to help the environment. That’s why Tim couldn’t make it today, because he is in Washington, D.C., with POW lobbying to protect the climate,” Hannah says during the interview.

Bowl with Savory Tahini dressing. | Hannah Eddy

Some benefits of the book are that it’s small, lightweight, printed on recycled paper and all the recipes are simple and made with inexpensive ingredients. It’s also about using a minimal number of dishes; most meals can be made over a Jetboil, which also helps the environment.

Hannah’s favorite recipe is Overnight Oats.

“It’s perfect for powder-day mornings; you can make it the night before. I like a good breakfast that you don’t have to do much for, but it is still hearty and tasty,” she says.

The cookbook is 62 pages with 45 recipes including some sauces. All but one recipe can be made on a stove. According to Hannah, the sauces are incredibly simple: “With many of them, you just put the ingredients in a Mason jar and shake it up.”

The cookbook will be available online in mid-October at a suggested donation of $20 to POW.

“We just encourage people to donate to POW and get something that’s cool, fun and useful out of it,” Hannah says. | doradical.com



Overnight Oats
From the Kitchen of Hannah Eddy

¾ C oats (either quick or rolled)
½ t cinnamon
1 T chia seeds
2 T dried fruit
Pinch of salt
1 T maple syrup
1 C water or nut milk
Optional additions
½ t spirulina powder
½ t maca powder
½ t cacoa powder

Portion all ingredients into a Mason jar or other glass vessel with a lid. Mix well and store refrigerated overnight. In the morning, top with whatever fruit you have on hand and a fat scoop of nut butter.


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California Bound: The Grigsby-Ide Party, Part III https://thetahoeweekly.com/2019/10/california-bound-the-grigsby-ide-party-part-iii/ Wed, 16 Oct 2019 18:53:23 +0000 https://thetahoeweekly.com/?p=55157 William Brown Ide and his fellow American pioneers who arrived with the 1845 overland migration into Alta California were well aware of the numerous threats issued by the Mexican government that circulated during the winter of 1845-46. The rainy season made travel throughout the region virtually impassible so the Americans had little to fear from […]

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William Ide’s grave marker in Monroeville. | Courtesy Thomas Crook

William Brown Ide and his fellow American pioneers who arrived with the 1845 overland migration into Alta California were well aware of the numerous threats issued by the Mexican government that circulated during the winter of 1845-46. The rainy season made travel throughout the region virtually impassible so the Americans had little to fear from the Mexican Army until spring. Despite being significantly outnumbered, thoughts of a fight for independence were percolating among the settlements.

Read Part I & Part II
Read more about the Mexican-American War

That winter, William L. Todd, nephew of lawyer Abraham Lincoln’s wife, Mary Todd, wrote a letter to his father in Illinois stating: “The Mexicans talk every spring and fall here of driving the foreigners out of the country. They must do it this year or they never can do it. There will be revolution before long, and probably this country will be re-annexed (sic) into the United States. If here, I will take a hand in it.”

On June 15, the Americans raised the Bear Flag to express their desire for a sovereign republic within the Mexican province of California and as a first step in absorbing the Pacific territory into the United States.

In May 1846, a messenger arrived from the south to alert Ide and the other emigrants who lived in the countryside around the old Spanish Mission at Sonoma that General Don Castro was leading a regiment north from Monterey to purge the invading Americans who had entered the country illegally without passports or permission. Fearing for their families, Ide, with his son William and some other men, searched out Gen. John C. Frémont and his exploration party who were encamped to the north at the Marysville Buttes. Frémont’s men were experienced and well-armed, but the Pathfinder told Ide that as an American officer he could not attack the Mexicans except in self-defense. The two countries were not at war — yet. Some of the men under Frémont’s command, including guide Kit Carson, requested to be released so they could return to fight with Ide at Sonoma. But Frémont refused as he was expecting to return east to the United States in a couple of weeks.

Despite disappointment in Frémont’s reaction, Ide turned south toward Mission Sonoma, a walled adobe plaza used as a Mexican military post and fortress, recruiting any American men he could find along the way, and stockpiling guns and ammunition. By the time the ragtag squad reached Sonoma on June 14, 1846, it consisted of only about 24 men.

John Bidwell, a future California congressman, brigadier general of the State Militia and presidential candidate for the Prohibition Party, described the revolutionaries: “Some were settlers, some hunters; some were good men, and some about as rough specimens of humanity as it would be possible to find anywhere.”

With Frémont’s blessing, the outnumbered but undaunted Americans captured the Mexican garrison and surrounded the home of its commander, Gen. Mariano Guadalupe Vallejo. After detaining Vallejo, along with his brother and two other Mexican officials, the prisoners were escorted under guard to Sutter’s Fort near the junction of the Sacramento and American rivers. Ironically, Gen. Vallejo backed the American movement for an independent state and became an ardent friend and supporter of the United States when war eventually broke out.

Ide and his men organized themselves into the Bear Flag Party, while retaining possession of the Sonoma barracks along with its guns and ammunition. They styled themselves into an independent government and proclaimed the birth of a new California Republic, electing Ide as governor and Commander-in-Chief.

On June 15, the Americans raised the Bear Flag to express their desire for a sovereign republic within the Mexican province of California and as a first step in absorbing the Pacific territory into the United States. Todd designed the Bear Flag using brown and black paint to illustrate a grizzly bear. It was so crudely rendered that the Mexicans wondered why the Americans had drawn a pig on their flag. The contemporary California state flag is roughly based on this early prototype. John Grigsby, Ide’s former co-captain of an 1845 wagon train, joined the action from his home in nearby Napa Valley and was commissioned captain of the Sonoma garrison.

In honor of this illegal but unstoppable revolt against a corrupt and weak Mexican presence in California, Ide wrote and issued a long-winded proclamation that appealed to the dissatisfied residents in the impoverished province. Ide’s key message was unmistakable: “The Commander-in-Chief at Sonoma [Ide] gives his inviolable pledge to all persons in California not bearing arms, or instigating others to take up arms against him, that they shall not be disturbed in their persons, property, religion, or social relations to each other, by men under my command…. And he hereby invites all good and patriotic citizens in California to assist him to establish and perpetuate a liberal, just and honorable government, which shall secure civil, religious and personal liberty to all.” His rousing call to arms inspired both American settlers and Mexican nationals to overthrow the hated military authority that leaders in Mexico City and Monterey were using to exploit Californians.

Meanwhile, Frémont and his force of 72 men were preparing to leave Sutter’s Fort for the east as previously planned, but instead this California Battalion deployed to Sonoma to support the Bear Flag uprising. At this point Ide was concerned for his family’s safety at their ranch near Red Bluff, but with Frémont’s arrival the revolution needed him more. Frémont quickly took command from Ide and the contingent marched south to Los Angeles, encountering little resistance. U.S. naval war ships had anchored in San Francisco and Monterey bays and raised the American flag there; five months later U.S General Stephen W. Kearny arrived in California with a remnant of his once formidable fighting force astride worn-out mules. In his first battle against Californio Lancers on well-trained horses, Kearny’s forces were soundly beaten and surrounded until U.S. marines and sailors arrived to turn the tide. The Mexican-American War was under way.

The Bear Flag Revolt was the first step in the conflict that led to the forcible appropriation of California from Mexico by the United States. Ide was leader of that insurgency, and thus for a brief time, president of the independent Bear Flag Republic during its 25-day existence. Historians of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints like to point out that the head of state of California’s first Republic was a Mormon. Ide later became prominent in the affairs of Colusa County and held many elected offices, including probate judge, county treasurer, surveyor, clerk, recorder and chairman of the board of county commissioners. He died of smallpox at Monroeville in Colusa County on Dec. 20, 1852, aged 56 years.


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Halloween balls & bashes https://thetahoeweekly.com/2019/10/halloween-balls-bashes-2/ Wed, 16 Oct 2019 18:52:07 +0000 https://thetahoeweekly.com/?p=55160 Get out your best costumes for parties, balls, bashes and frightful events this Halloween season throughout the Tahoe Sierra. Visit TheTahoeWeekly.com: Event Calendar for all of the Halloween events throughout the Tahoe-Reno region to enjoy. Truckee Haunted Historic Tour Oct. 17-18 | Downtown Truckee Part fact and part fiction, this spooky nighttime tour begins and […]

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Courtesy Truckee Haunted Historic Tour

Get out your best costumes for parties, balls, bashes and frightful events this Halloween season throughout the Tahoe Sierra. Visit TheTahoeWeekly.com: Event Calendar for all of the Halloween events throughout the Tahoe-Reno region to enjoy.

Truckee Haunted Historic Tour
Oct. 17-18 | Downtown Truckee
Part fact and part fiction, this spooky nighttime tour begins and ends at Moody’s Bistro Bar. The tour takes guests through historic downtown accompanied by hilarious and outrageous performers from the Old West. | truckeehistorytour.org

The Haunting
Oct. 24 | West Shore Café | Homewood
This Halloween dinner experience won’t be for the faint of heart. Guests will first gain VIP access to Homewood’s haunted chairlift ride before they are served a spooky supper. Expect killer cocktails, swamp juice, treacle tarts, bat wings, cauldrons of eyeballs and finger foods. | westshorecafe.com

Zombie Cabaret & Walk
Oct. 25-26 | Hard Rock | Stateline, Nev.
Hard Rock hosts a weekend of festivities with the Living Dead DJ on the Guitar Plaza and Center Bar, as well as the Zombie Cabaret in Vinyl on Oct. 25. The haunts continue on Oct. 26 with the Zombie Walk in Guitar Plaza, the return of the Living Dead DJ, and the Zombie Cabaret and Costume Contest in Vinyl. | hardrockcasinolaketahoe.com

Halloweekend at Homewood
Oct. 25-27 | Homewood Mountain Resort | Homewood
When the sun goes down the goblins, ghosts, and ghouls come out from 3 to 9 p.m. there will be a peak-to-shore fright-fest featuring spooky fun for the whole family. Take a stroll through the trick-or-treat village at South Base featuring free scary movie showings, face painting, pumpkin decorating, and surprises from local vendors. | skihomewood.com

Freakers’ Ball
Oct. 26 | MontBleu Resort | Stateline, Nev.
The 41st annual Freakers’ Ball, Lake Tahoe’s largest and most extravagant Halloween party, offers three parties in one. It has become legendary due to partygoers who take risqué to the limit. DJs, go-go dancers, laser lights and $10,000 in contest prizes. | montbleuresort.com

Halloween Monsters & Metal Bash
Oct. 26 | Alibi Ale Works | Incline Village, Nev.
All you ghouls, zombies and monsters, it’s time for Alibi Ale Works-Incline 1st Halloween Party from 9 p.m. to midnight featuring Metal Echo. Come in costume and skip the cover; prizes for Best Costume. | facebook.com

Creeper’s Ball
Oct. 26 | Crystal Bay Casino | Crystal Bay, Nev.
The Creeper’s Ball returns to the casino’s Crown Room with Tainted Love, guest DJs and Halloween after party. | crystalbaycasino.com

Halloween Bash and Costume Party
Oct. 31 | The Loft | South Lake Tahoe
There will be a slew of mind-bending fun as world-class magicians make their way through The Loft Theatre featuring DJ Jos Beatz. Prizes for best costumes. | thelofttahoe.com

Hole-O-ween
Oct. 31 | Tahoe Biltmore | Crystal Bay, Nev.
Wormhole Tahoe and Rambo Party Productions are teaming up to bring one haunted, hell of a night, in all the best ways: Hole-O-ween featuring Stylust, with support from LabRat, Dastardly and Rambo. | tahoebiltmore.com

“The Rocky Horror Picture Show”
Oct. 31 | Tahoe Art Haus | Tahoe City
Relive this 1975 cult classic through the elaborate dances and rock songs. For the first time, there will be a live shadow cast by Amber’s Sweets who will act out the movie and sell props. Dress up as your favorite character and be prepared to sing along to the Time Warp starting at 10 p.m. | tahoearthauscinema.com


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Dazzling views along Fallen Leaf Lake trail https://thetahoeweekly.com/2019/10/dazzling-views-along-fallen-leaf-lake-trail/ Wed, 16 Oct 2019 18:51:52 +0000 https://thetahoeweekly.com/?p=55163 Lake Tahoe is certainly a world-class beauty, but sometimes Big Blue can feel downright crowded, noisy, even frenetic. A scenic, casual stroll through the soothing forest surrounding Fallen Leaf Lake is an excellent cure for that. Fallen Leaf Lake is nestled near the base of majestic Mount Tallac — a distinctive 9,735-foot-high granite escarpment that […]

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Fallen Leaf Lake reflection. | Mark McLaughlin

Lake Tahoe is certainly a world-class beauty, but sometimes Big Blue can feel downright crowded, noisy, even frenetic. A scenic, casual stroll through the soothing forest surrounding Fallen Leaf Lake is an excellent cure for that. Fallen Leaf Lake is nestled near the base of majestic Mount Tallac — a distinctive 9,735-foot-high granite escarpment that indigenous Washoe Indians called “Great Mountain” — south of Emerald Bay. The charming lake and the mellow terrain encompassing its basin boasts old-growth cedar and pine trees, twittering aspen groves and dazzling views of rugged, glaciated Sierra high country.

There are many enjoyable hikes in this area, but the Moraine Trail is an easy, short excursion for those seeking a quiet respite from the hustle and bustle of Tahoe’s busy summer scene.

Fallen Leaf Lake is located west of Highway 89, about 3 miles north of South Lake Tahoe. It’s thought that the lake — at 3 miles long the second largest in the Tahoe Basin — is named after a Delaware Indian scout who guided an early Tahoe Sierra exploration party led by Colonel Jack “Cock-Eye” Johnson around 1850. Johnson was a noted early pioneer in the region who, among other things, blazed the Johnson Cut-off through the mountains, later to become Highway 50. To reach the Moraine Trail, drive up Fallen Leaf Lake Road and turn right into the campground. At the entrance bear left and continue on to the no-fee, day-use parking lot near campsite No. 75.

Fallen Leaf Lake dam spillway into Taylor Creek. | Mark McLaughlin

There are many enjoyable hikes in this area, but the Moraine Trail is an easy, short excursion for those seeking a quiet respite. A moraine is the term for the unconsolidated glacial debris consisting of rock and till that forms on both sides and terminus of a glacier. Active mountain ice caps formed over the Sierra Nevada during past climate regimes when year-round temperatures were lower and snowfall greater than now. Glaciers of various sizes surged down from the upper elevations, carving sawtooth ridges, pyramidal peaks and lake basins. Fallen Leaf Lake was formed this way, as was nearby Cascade Lake and even Emerald Bay. The Fallen Leaf and Cascade lake basins were caught behind the massive terminal moraine piled up by the snout of the glacier, but at Emerald Bay the ice movement was dynamic enough to punch into the main gorge now filled by the waters of Lake Tahoe. Emerald Bay’s lovely Fannett Island is simply a relic of granite that was so obdurate that the glacial ice cleaved around it.

Sunbathers enjoy the view of Mount Tallac before the snow melted. | Mark McLaughlin

The Moraine Trail is a basic up-and-back route about 2 miles roundtrip, but it offers access to classic old-school lake swimming, fine fishing, boating and historical exploration. The hike parallels crystal-clear Taylor Creek as it flows downhill toward its discharge into Lake Tahoe at Baldwin Beach. The creek is well-known for its Kokanee salmon spawn each October. Named after Elijah W. Taylor, who settled 160 acres near the creek in 1864, the stream was a popular fishing site for the Washoe Tribe and represents one of the most significant Indian campsites in the Tahoe Basin. Taylor Creek’s source is the spillway at Fallen Leaf Lake dam, built by Anita M. Baldwin in 1934 to enlarge the natural lake. Anita was the daughter of Elias Jackson Baldwin who purchased 2,000 acres of lakefront land in 1880 from hotel owner and tourism promoter Ephraim “Yank” Clement.

“Lucky” Baldwin had made a fortune investing in Comstock mining operations and bought the Tahoe property to develop a fancy summer resort and to protect the remaining old-growth forest from the loggers’ axe. When hiking in the area keep your eyes peeled for these ancient monarchs from Lake Tahoe’s ancient timberlands.

When you reach the Fallen Leaf Lake dam cross to the other side on the pedestrian walkway. Bear left on the trail near the lakeshore and continue to the ruins of early 20th Century summer homes, evidenced by foundations and standing rock chimneys. The section of trail that leads to the historic building foundations was underwater during my reconnaissance but is probably passable now. Instead of returning back to the trailhead along the same route, consider re-crossing the dam and taking the path to your right alongside Fallen Leaf Lake. This lakeview trail meanders back to the day-use parking lot.


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