Roast Stuffed Pork Loin

Snow, snow and more snow was the order of the new year. It seems like it was a long time coming, but we were definitely due for the big dump and that is exactly what we got. Once it started snowing, it just kept on coming, sometimes mixing with or even turning to rain. But in the end, it was still measured in feet.

For some of my friends, this was what they have been waiting for. Not just because they are ski instructors, but because for the first time in while, they could break out their sleds.

Now I have to say, the sleds they ride are not the old flexible flyers we rode as kids. They aren’t even the red sleds that were the equivalent of a plastic toboggan. The sleds they ride are snowmobiles and for them it is another way to enjoy the snow on their day off.

This meal is about as easy as almost any meat dish to prepare and the loin is a lean cut, so there is little fat.

For most people, riding a snowmobile needs slightly more exertion than driving a car. For those, like my friends, who take it to that level, snowmobiling is a lot of work. Riding hard all day and trying to get those machines to maneuver takes technique, skill and brute strength.

Snowmobiling can be intense and you need a good meal the night before going out to keep you satisifed. For this we are talking protein and pork loin is a great way to get that protein.

This meal is about as easy as almost any meat dish to prepare and the loin is a lean cut so there is little fat. As soon as you mention stuffed, many people will get scared because you have to slice the meat to stuff it. You also have to cut your meat into bite-sized pieces and that involves a lot more cutting than the one or two slices it takes to open the loin.

Lay the pork on the cutting board with the fat side up. Cut the loin widthwise about one-third up from the bottom a quarter inch from the other side. Fold the top two-thirds over to open the loin and continue the cut at the same level across. This will give you one piece of pork the same thickness (one-third the original thickness of the loin), which can be stuffed and easily rolled and then tied.

For the stuffing, you can make packaged stuffing in 5 minutes. Make the stuffing first so it has a little time to cool. Make a little garlic and salt paste to rub liberally over the pork and season with pepper and rosemary.

Roast Stuffed Pork Loin

  • 1/3 of a pork loin
  • 1 box stuffing mix
  • 3 cloves garlic
  • Rosemary, salt & pepper
  • Butcher’s twine to tie

Make the stuffing and let cool it a little. Slice the loin widthwise one-third the way up from the cutting board to about a quarter inch from the other side. Fold the top two-thirds over and continue the cut at the same level to leave one piece of meat the same thickness three times wider than before.

Cover the pork with the stuffing leaving about 1 inch along one side clear. Roll from the covered side toward the open side and tie. Use the side of a knife to mash the garlic with some salt to make a paste and coat the pork. Season with rosemary and pepper and then cook the pork with the fat side down for the first 20 minutes and flip to finish cooking.

For an easy pan sauce, add 1 cup of water to the pan and let it reduce, being sure to scrape all the crispy bits off the bottom of the pan.

Let the pork rest for 15 minutes before slicing.

 

Smitty is a personal chef specializing in dinner parties, cooking classes and special events. Trained under Master Chef Anton Flory at Top Notch Resort in Stowe, Vt., Smitty is known for his creative use of fresh ingredients. To read archived copies of Smitty’s column, visit chefsmitty.com or TheTahoeWeekly.com. Contact him at tmmsmitty@gmail.com or (530) 412-3598.

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Chef Smitty
Smitty is a personal chef specializing in dinner parties, cooking classes and special events. Trained under Master Chef Anton Flory at Top Notch Resort in Stowe, Vt., Smitty is known for his creative use of fresh ingredients. Smitty has been teaching skiing at Squaw Valley Alpine Meadows for more than 26 years each winter, and spends his summers working for High Sierra Waterski School since 2000. Smitty has been writing his chef column for Tahoe Weekly since 2005.